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The Jordanian Labor Market in the New Millennium$
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Ragui Assaad

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780198702054

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198702054.001.0001

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Gender and the Jordanian Labor Market

Gender and the Jordanian Labor Market

Chapter:
(p.105) 4 Gender and the Jordanian Labor Market
Source:
The Jordanian Labor Market in the New Millennium
Author(s):

Ragui Assaad

Rana Hendy

Chaimaa Yassine

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198702054.003.0004

This chapter further investigates the low and stagnant female participation rates. Not only is the female labour force participation rate in Jordan very low, but it also appears to have been relatively stagnant over the past decade. This is a paradoxical finding given the rapid rise in female educational attainment in Jordan. The only way to resolve such a paradox is to have falling participation rates among educated women over time, counteracted by an improving educational composition to produce flat participation rates. The chapter argues that this is in fact what is happening in Jordan and that the decline in participation among educated women is due to a deteriorating opportunity structure in the Jordanian labour market. With the curtailment of public sector hiring in Jordan since the mid-1980s, opportunities for educated women have become much scarcer

Keywords:   female labour force participation, educational attainment, opportunity structure

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