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Legitimacy and Criminal JusticeAn International Exploration$
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Justice Tankebe and Alison Liebling

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780198701996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198701996.001.0001

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Legitimacy, Trust, And Compliance: An Empirical Test Of Procedural Justice Theory Using The European Social Survey

Legitimacy, Trust, And Compliance: An Empirical Test Of Procedural Justice Theory Using The European Social Survey

Chapter:
(p.326) 16 Legitimacy, Trust, And Compliance: An Empirical Test Of Procedural Justice Theory Using The European Social Survey
Source:
Legitimacy and Criminal Justice
Author(s):

Mike Hough

Jonathan Jackson

Ben Bradford

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198701996.003.0017

This chapter presents findings from a large-scale empirical test of procedural justice theory, which we (and colleagues) designed using the fifth European Social Survey. The chapter first of all locates concerns about institutional legitimacy within a broader framework of ‘compliance theories’. It then sets out its definitional stall in an attempt to clarify what is meant by the ‘slippery’ concept of legitimacy and how the term is used in different contexts. Then, in testing various hypotheses on procedural justice, the chapter employs a tripartite definition of empirical (i.e. perceived) legitimacy. The chapter defines empirical legitimacy as the recognition and justification of the right to exercise power and influence, with influence mostly of the normative (rather than instrumental) variety, and importantly our tripartite notions of consent, moral alignment and legality accord with some well-established social psychological mechanisms of identification and internalisation.

Keywords:   legitimacy, procedural justice, moral alignment, compliance

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