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A Life Course Approach to Chronic Disease Epidemiology$
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Diana Kuh, Yoav Ben Shlomo, and Susser Ezra

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198578154

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198578154.001.0001

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Ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease mortality trends with special reference to England and Wales; are there cohort effects?

Ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease mortality trends with special reference to England and Wales; are there cohort effects?

Chapter:
(p.116) Chapter 5 Ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease mortality trends with special reference to England and Wales; are there cohort effects?
Source:
A Life Course Approach to Chronic Disease Epidemiology
Author(s):

Diana Kuh

Yoav Ben-Shlomo

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198578154.003.0005

It is widely believed that trends in ischemic heart disease (IHD) death rates in many countries have risen to a synchronized peak at every age and then declined. This has been taken as evidence that the factors responsible for the rise and fall in rates have acted in adult life. It has also been taken as evidence against the important influence of early life factors on the incidence of disease. The argument is that early life factors would produce cohort effects, that is, changes in the rates that were synchronized according to year of birth rather than year of death. This chapter examines trends in IHD rates in England and Wales to assess whether this popular belief is true. It also analyzes cerebrovascular disease rates in England and Wales.

Keywords:   IHD, death rates, mortality rates, cerebrovascular disease, adult risk factors, cohort effects, CVD

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