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The Science of Well-Being$
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Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis, and Barry Keverne

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198567523

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198567523.001.0001

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* Intelligence and culture: how culture shapes what intelligence means, and the implications for a science of well-being

* Intelligence and culture: how culture shapes what intelligence means, and the implications for a science of well-being

Chapter:
(p.360) (p.361) Chapter 14* Intelligence and culture: how culture shapes what intelligence means, and the implications for a science of well-being
Source:
The Science of Well-Being
Author(s):

Robert J. Sternberg

Elena L. Grigorenko

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198567523.003.0014

This chapter studies intelligence under the viewpoint of positive psychology. The first section recounts the authors' experiences in their research on intelligence, which seem to support the chapter's theory that intelligence cannot be evaluated properly if taken out of its cultural context. This is followed by a discussion on the theory of successful intelligence which posits that a balance between analytical, creative, and practical abilities is necessary for success. The third section presents relevant cultural studies on how people perceive intelligence. Findings show that children may develop contextually important skills at the expense of academic ones and may have substantial practical skills unrecognized in standard tests. Other conclusions show that practical intellectual skills may be better predictors of health and that the latter affects assessment performance. The remaining sections contrast dynamic versus static testing and present new intermediate tests for cognition.

Keywords:   intelligence, positive psychology, cultural context, successful intelligence, intellectual skills, dynamic testing, static testing

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