Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Orbitofrontal Cortex$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Zald and Scott Rauch

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198565741

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198565741.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 October 2017

Sequential and parallel circuits for emotional processing in primate orbitofrontal cortex

Sequential and parallel circuits for emotional processing in primate orbitofrontal cortex

Chapter:
(p.57) Chapter 4 Sequential and parallel circuits for emotional processing in primate orbitofrontal cortex
Source:
The Orbitofrontal Cortex
Author(s):

Helen Barbas

Basilis Zikopoulos

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198565741.003.0004

Several features of the circuits of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) suggest that it is in an ideal position to convey signals associated with the emotional significance of events. Key features of this neural circuitry include: the role of the posterior orbital regions as a global environment integrator; the distinction between input and output zones linking the OFC with the amygdala; the role of projections to the intercalated masses in the amygdala in controlling central nucleus output; the involvement of connections to medial temporal cortex in emotional memory; and the potential importance of information transfer from the OFC to lateral prefrontal cortices in decision-making. Ultimately, the OFC communicates with lateral and caudal medial prefrontal cortices in synergistic functions in decision and action in behavior.

Keywords:   afferent, amygdala, efferent, hypothalamus, limbic, prefrontal, memory, sensory, decision-making

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .