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Exploring the Musical MindCognition, emotion, ability, function$
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John Sloboda

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198530121

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198530121.001.0001

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Emotion, Functionality, and the Everyday Experience of Music: Where does Music Education Fit?

Emotion, Functionality, and the Everyday Experience of Music: Where does Music Education Fit?

Chapter:
(p.360) (p.361) Chapter 21 Emotion, Functionality, and the Everyday Experience of Music: Where does Music Education Fit?
Source:
Exploring the Musical Mind
Author(s):

John Sloboda

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198530121.003.0021

This chapter is intended to raise broad issues about the nature and purpose of general music education. Although it is grounded in an empirically observable phenomenon, it goes far beyond scientifically validated data in an attempt to locate the phenomenon it observes within a broad historical and cultural context. Music education in schools cannot function effectively without an implicit agreement between stakeholders about what it is for. The ‘meaning of music’ is a constantly shifting function of the discourses of these diverse groups, which may coalesce around a ‘dominant ideology’ which gains enough inter-group consensus to generate a stable educational agenda. It may be no longer possible to muster stakeholder consensus around any version of the educational enterprise which prioritises the classical canon. Strong cultural forces have been at work which account for the collapse of this consensus. This chapter identifies seven such forces: multiculturalism, youth culture, electronic communication, feminism, secularism, niche cultures, and postmodernism.

Keywords:   music education, stakeholder consensus, cultural forces, multiculturalism, youth culture, electronic communication, feminism, secularism, niche cultures, postmodernism

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