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Musical Communication$
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Dorothy Miell, Raymond MacDonald, and David J. Hargreaves

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198529361

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529361.001.0001

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From mimesis to catharsis

From mimesis to catharsis

expression, perception, and induction of emotion in music

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter 5 From mimesis to catharsis
Source:
Musical Communication
Author(s):

Patrik N. Juslin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529361.003.0005

This chapter reviews theoretical concepts and empirical findings on musical emotions. First, it examines the notion of music as a means of communicating emotion and presents some relevant evidence concerning the issue. Then it provides a working definition of emotions and some conceptual distinctions for the study of musical emotion. It reviews mechanisms through which music may express and induce emotions. Finally, it considers various objections to music-as-communication and provides an agenda for future research. The discussion is limited to Western music, especially classical and popular music from the 18th century to present day.

Keywords:   musical communication, musical emotions, Western music, music-as-communicated, classical music, popular music

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