Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Stealing the GoldA celebration of the pioneering physics of Sam Edwards$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Goldbart, Nigel Goldenfeld, and David Sherrington

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198528531

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528531.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2018

REPRINT THE THEORY OF RUBBER ELASTICITY

REPRINT THE THEORY OF RUBBER ELASTICITY

Chapter:
(p.238) 16 REPRINT THE THEORY OF RUBBER ELASTICITY
Source:
Stealing the Gold
Author(s):

R. T. Deam

S. F. Edwards

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528531.003.0018

This chapter reprints a paper which attempts to improve upon several weaknesses in the classical theories of rubber elasticity. It develops a formulation of the statistical thermodynamics of amorphous materials analogous to the Gibbs formalism for conventional statistical mechanics. This then permits the replacement of ‘phantom chains’, i.e., long polymer molecules with the fictitious property that they experience no forces except at cross link points and are transparent to one another, by realistic molecules which do experience forces and which can become entangled. The chapter is divided into four sections. The first section demonstrates that just as Gibbs's famous formula provides an abstract formula for the statistical mechanics of systems in which all states are accessible, the new formula extends to systems with frozen-in degrees of freedom. The second section shows how the formalism fits the problem of rubber elasticity. In the third section, the effect of excluded volume, i.e., of short-range forces, is included in the calculation of the free energy of a rubber, while in fourth section, the effects of entanglements are included to complete the kinds of force normally encountered.

Keywords:   phantom chain models, polymer networks, free energy, Gibbs formula, rubber elasticity, entanglement

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .