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Bird Ecology and Conservation$
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William J. Sutherland, Ian Newton, and Rhys Green

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198520863

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198520863.001.0001

Bird diversity survey methods

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Bird diversity survey methods
Source:
Bird Ecology and Conservation
Author(s):

Colin J. Bibby

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198520863.003.0001

The chapter focuses on the design and methods of bird survey programmes. It deals with issues such as survey design and selection of study areas, effect of time of day and time of year on counts, how to find and count different kinds of birds, standardizing census efforts in time and space, and problems of bird detectability and survey comparability in different habitats. Mapping or ‘atlas’ methodology, based on grid cells, is also discussed, as well as methods of estimating species richness and diversity, and the storage and accessibility of data. The key points in designing bird surveys are listed. No survey method is perfect; the method chosen should be suited to both purpose and resources, in terms of money, manpower, and skill levels.

Keywords:   count, census, mapping, atlas project, species richness, species diversity

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