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The Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids$
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David W. Macdonald and Claudio Sillero-Zubiri

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198515562

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515562.001.0001

Ethiopian wolves

Afroalpine ecology, solitary foraging, and intense sociality amongst Ethiopian wolves

Chapter:
(p.311) CHAPTER 20 Ethiopian wolves
Source:
The Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids
Author(s):

Claudio Sillero-Zubiri

Jorgelina Marino

Dada Gottelli

David W. Macdonald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515562.003.0020

The Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis), at about 20 kg, differs from such typical, medium-size canids as the coyote (Canis latrans) in its unusually long legs and a long muzzle. Restricted to rodent-rich Afroalpine habitat within the Ethiopian highlands, its diurnal habits and distinctive coat render this species conspicuous. Field studies of Ethiopian wolves began in 1988, with a focus on the Bale Mountains. Conservation and research activities continue in Bale and have recently expanded to other populations in Ethiopia. This chapter analyses data previously presented.

Keywords:   Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensis, Afroalpine rodents, Bale Mountains, conservation, breeding

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