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Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research$
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Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton, and Martin Conway

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198508809

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508809.001.0001

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Components of episodic memory: the contribution of recollection and familiarity

Components of episodic memory: the contribution of recollection and familiarity

Chapter:
(p.31) 3 Components of episodic memory: the contribution of recollection and familiarity
Source:
Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research
Author(s):

Andrew P. Yonelinas

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508809.003.0003

The examination of recognition memory confidence judgements indicates that there are two separate components or processes underlying episodic memory. Recollection is assumed to reflect a threshold process whereby qualitative information about the study event is retrieved, whereas familiarity reflects a classical signal-detection process whereby items exceeding a familiarity response criterion are accepted as having been studied. Evidence from cognitive, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging studies indicate that the model is in agreement with the existing recognition results, and indicate that recollection and familiarity are behaviourally, neurally, and phenomenologically distinct memory retrieval processes.

Keywords:   episodic memory, recollection, familiarity, recognition memory, signal-detection process, neuroimaging studies

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