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Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research$
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Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton, and Martin Conway

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198508809

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508809.001.0001

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Episodic memory and autonoetic consciousness: a first-person approach

Episodic memory and autonoetic consciousness: a first-person approach

Chapter:
(p.11) 2 Episodic memory and autonoetic consciousness: a first-person approach
Source:
Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research
Author(s):

John M. Gardiner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508809.003.0002

Episodic memory is identified with autonoetic consciousness, which gives rise to remembering in the sense of self-recollection in the mental re-enactment of previous events at which one was present. Autonoetic consciousness is distinguished from noetic consciousness, which gives rise to awareness of the past that is limited to feelings of familiarity or knowing. Noetic consciousness is identified not with episodic but with semantic memory, which involves general knowledge. A recently developed approach to episodic memory makes use of ‘first-person’ reports of remembering and knowing. Studies using this approach have revealed many independent variables that selectively affect remembering and others that selectively affect knowing. These studies can also be interpreted in terms of distinctiveness and fluency of processing.

Keywords:   episodic memory, autonoetic consciousness, self-recollection, mental re-enactment, semantic memory, first-person reports

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