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The Local Governance of Crime: Appeals to Community and Partnerships$
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Adam Crawford

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198298458

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198298458.001.0001

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The Genesis of the ‘Partnership’ Approach and Appeals to ‘Community’ in Crime Control

The Genesis of the ‘Partnership’ Approach and Appeals to ‘Community’ in Crime Control

Chapter:
(p.14) 2 The Genesis of the ‘Partnership’ Approach and Appeals to ‘Community’ in Crime Control
Source:
The Local Governance of Crime: Appeals to Community and Partnerships
Author(s):

Adam Crawford

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198298458.003.0002

This chapter describes the genesis of the ‘partnership’ approach and the recent rebirth of appeals to ‘community’ and ‘prevention’ within contemporary British crime-control policy and practice. It begins with a brief historical account of earlier forms of local governance in crime control and some of the transformations in policing and criminal justice which have occurred over the past 200 years. Then, it examines the recent interest in ‘prevention’, ‘community’, and ‘partnerships’ within crime-control policy. Each of these concepts is considered, outlining the most important policy developments, academic debates, and practical initiatives. The ways in which and the extent to which these notions have impacted upon different criminal justice agencies and their work are examined. Throughout the analysis, special attention is placed on the recurring critical relationships between formal and professionalized systems of crime control and the attraction of informal or community-based models.

Keywords:   crime-control policy, partnership, community, criminal justice, United Kingdom, crime prevention

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