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The Role of Government in East Asian Economic DevelopmentComparative Institutional Analysis$
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Masahiko Aoki, Hyung-Ki Kim, and Masahiro Okuno-Fujiwara

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198294917

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198294917.001.0001

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The Political Economy of Growth in East Asia: A Perspective on the State, Market, and Ideology

The Political Economy of Growth in East Asia: A Perspective on the State, Market, and Ideology

Chapter:
(p.323) 11 The Political Economy of Growth in East Asia: A Perspective on the State, Market, and Ideology
Source:
The Role of Government in East Asian Economic Development
Author(s):

Meredith Woo‐Cumings

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198294917.003.0011

This chapter discusses the impact of differences in initial conditions and international environments on the developmental strategy between Latin America and East Asia (Korea and Taiwan). The unique imprint of Japanese colonial legacies on the bureaucratic nature of the state in Korea and Taiwan, and its relations with business and agrarian interests are elucidated. How the specific geopolitical positions of these two economies affect their developmental strategies as well as their capabilities to extract ‘rent’ from the United States during the Cold War is discussed.

Keywords:   Korea, Taiwan, Latin America, geopolitics, rents

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