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Propaganda and Culture in Mao's China$
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Timothy Cheek

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198290667

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198290667.001.0001

Conclusion: Broken Jade

Chapter:
(p.307) Conclusion: Broken Jade
Source:
Propaganda and Culture in Mao's China
Author(s):

Timothy Cheek

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198290667.003.0008

In honouring Deng Tuo, his colleagues refer to him as ‘broken jade’. Educated counsellors to the ruler, whom today would generally be considered as intellectuals, have long been referred to as jade in China. Not only the man but his career as a scholar-cadre in the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is ‘broken jade’. Deng Tuo's charismatic role in the public arena was struck down in the Cultural Revolution and with it the priestly vocation of the Maoist cadre. Finally, the ideological system Deng Tuo served, Maoism, has shattered. In truth, Maoism was as precious as jade to Deng Tuo, and to many who served with him. It is with the pieces of Deng Tuo's life, vocation, and beliefs that his successors must fashion their future and China's.

Keywords:   Deng Tuo, broken jade, Chinese Communist Party, CCP, Cultural Revolution, Maoism

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