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Ministers and ParliamentAccountability in Theory and Practice$
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Diana Woodhouse

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198278924

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198278924.001.0001

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Cases of Non-Resignation: An Evasion of Ministerial Responsibility?

Cases of Non-Resignation: An Evasion of Ministerial Responsibility?

Chapter:
(p.136) 8 Cases of Non-Resignation: An Evasion of Ministerial Responsibility?
Source:
Ministers and Parliament
Author(s):

DIANA WOODHOUSE

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198278924.003.0008

The cases presented in this chapter show some common points on how cases of non-resignation are handled, both favourable and unfair. There is already great difficulty with the present system of accountability for operational matters, for the police do not account directly to Parliament and any other line of accountability is somewhat tenuous. The Home Secretary can be asked detailed questions by the House about police conduct, thereby producing an indirect accountability. Often, in cases such as these, as presented in this chapter, slackness and weakness in supervision is often revealed. Moreover, these types of cases require the incident to provide the personal fault that is necessary for the constitution to even raise the question of resignation on constitutional grounds.

Keywords:   Home Secretary, non-resignation, accountability, ministerial responsibility, indirect accountability, Parliament

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