Appendix B Guide to Surviving Pre-Ecclesiological Liturgical Arrangements in Britain - Oxford Scholarship Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Buildings, Faith, and Worship$

Helen Yates

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198270133

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270133.001.0001

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(p.192) Appendix B Guide to Surviving Pre-Ecclesiological Liturgical Arrangements in Britain

(p.192) Appendix B Guide to Surviving Pre-Ecclesiological Liturgical Arrangements in Britain

Source:
Buildings, Faith, and Worship
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This list aims to include all the most complete known examples of pre-ecclesiological church and chapel interiors, both Anglican and non-Anglican, in the British Isles. It is, however, almost entirely based on personal visits to these buildings by the author over the last fifteen years and cannot claim to be fully comprehensive, particularly in respect of areas outside England, where much work still remains to be done on the identification of unaltered religious buildings. The list takes account of the reorganization of local authorities in England, Scotland, and Wales, which took place in 1996–8, and is therefore arranged in five sections: English shire counties; English unitary authorities; Scottish unitary authorities; Welsh unitary authorities; the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland. Unless otherwise indicated, all the buildings listed—the overwhelming majority in fact—are Anglican. Where buildings have been vested in conservation bodies this has been indicated. The date of all liturgical arrangements is noted, together with the names of the architects and those commissioning them where this is known. Each building is categorized by liturgical type as follows:

  1. 1. Traditional Anglican arrangement with pulpit and reading-desk either next to the altar or in one of the eastern angles of the nave.

  2. 2. North-south rectangular interior with pulpit and reading-desk on one of the long walls.

  3. 3. East-west rectangular interior with pulpit and reading-desk on one of the long walls.

  4. 4. T-plan or L-plan arrangement with all seats focused on the pulpit and reading-desk.

  5. 5. Collegiate interior with position of pulpit and reading-desk indicated in each case.

  6. 6. Pulpit and reading-desk separated and placed one on either side of the altar or the entrance to the chancel.

This categorization has been used, with appropriate modifications, for non-Anglican buildings as well. Buildings have only been included where the majority of furnishings remain in situ, there have been few (if any) later additions, and the liturgical arrangement has not been significantly altered. In those areas in which there are an above average number of surviving buildings, the less complete examples of pre-ecclesiological interiors have been omitted. Where buildings have been described in the main text, or illustrated in the supporting plates, the appropriate (p.193) reference is given; where this is not the case a brief description of the interior has been given.

Section 1: English Shire Counties

Bedfordshire

  1. 1. Cockayne Hatley (St John Baptist)

    Type 5. Refitted from 1826 with imported furnishings for Revd Henry Cust; 17th-cent. baroque stalls, screens, and altar rails from Belgian churches; reading-desks in both N. and S. stall blocks; pulpit formerly at W. end of nave removed in 1963 for relocation in Carlisle cathedral; some imported medieval stained glass with other glass of 1829–39 by Thomas Willement.

  2. 2. Melchbourne (St Mary Magdalene)

    Type 1. 1779; altered internally in 1858 when organ and seats for singers and children placed at W. end of nave; family pew with fireplace in chancel; original altar table, box pews, pulpit, and reading-desk.

  3. 3. Old Warden (St Leonard)

    Type 6. Refitted 1841–2 with imported furnishings for Lord Ongley; Belgian hanging pulpit and separate reading-desk on opposite sides of nave; carved altar table; mix of box pews and stalls; gallery across part of S. aisle.

  4. 4. Roxton (Independent Chapel)

    Type 3. 1808; with thatched roof and veranda supported by tree trunks; original seating with canopied family pews against long walls; organ and pulpit (still of traditional early 19th-cent. type) date from c.1850.

Buckinghamshire

  1. 5. Thornton (St Michael, CCT)

    Type 5. c.1850; unaltered interior, see p. 110.

  2. 6. Winslow (Keech’s Meeting, Baptist)

    Type 3. Refitted 1821; communion table in front of pulpit with seats for deacons and trustees on each side; benches for congregation; narrow gallery for singers opposite pulpit.

Cambridgeshire

  1. 7. Leighton Bromswold (St Mary)

    Type 6. Refitted 1626–30; original benches, stalls, pulpit and reading-desk; see pp. 33, 35 115 and Plate 16a.

  2. 8. Wimpole Hall Chapel (NT)

    Type 5. 1724; painted ceiling and walls by Sir James Thornhill; pulpit adjacent to altar; family pew in W. gallery.

(p.194) Cheshire

  1. 9. Baddiley (St Michael)

    Type 1. Refitted 1811 when chancel encased in brick; original three-decker pulpit, box pews, and W. gallery; medieval screen with tympanum of 1663, painted with Ten Commandments, Creed, Lord’s Prayer, and other scriptural texts, and supporting framed Royal Arms.

  2. 10. Birtles (St Catherine)

    Type 6. 1840; for Thomas Hibbert of Birtles Hall; furnishings mostly imported but from both English and foreign sources; screen across W. end of church supports former family pew; pulpit made up from three separate 17th-cent. pulpits; reading-desk incorporates 15th-cent. eagle lectern; box pews incorporate 17th-cent. settles; stained glass from German, Dutch, and Swiss sources.

  3. 11. Cholmondeley (St Nicholas)

    Type 6. Fittings of 1652–5, 1716–18 and 1829–31; chancel screen supports arms of Lord Leicester (facing E.) and Marquess of Cholmondeley (facing W.); pulpit, reading-desk and raised family pew at W. end of nave all have cushions made up from robes worn by Marquess of Cholmondeley as Lord Chamberlain at coronation of William IV; altar carpet made up from same source; imported stained glass from German and Dutch sources; some box pews removed to make space for organ; galleries across ends of N. and S. transepts have been dismantled.

  4. 12. Nether Tabley (St Peter)

    Type 5. Fittings of 1675–8 retained when church re-erected on new site in 1927–9; pulpit and large reading-desk at E. end of S. stall block; some windows contain 17th-cent. foreign stained glass.

  5. 13. Saltersford (St John Baptist alias Jenkin Chapel)

    Type 1. 1733 with tower of 1754–5; largely unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and deep W. gallery approached by external staircase.

  6. 14. Shotwick (St Michael)

    Type 1. Refitted 1812; later furnishings in chancel and N. chapel; see pp. 75–6.

  7. 15. Tushingham (St Chad, Old Church)

    Type 1. 1689–91; largely unaltered interior with family pews flanking altar, three-decker pulpit, low chancel screen, benches in nave, and W. gallery with external staircase.

  8. 16. Woodhey Chapel

    Type 5. Unaltered interior of c.1700, see pp. 109–10.

Cornwall

  1. 17. St Anthony-in-Roseland (St Anthony, CCT)

    Type 6. Refitted 1850–1 by Tractarian rector, C. W. Carlyon, though not fully (p.195) ecclesiological; chancel empty apart from altar table, railed in at E. end with reredos incorporating tall panels for Ten Commandments either side of E. window; large pulpit and equally large reading-desk on opposite sides of chancel arch; open benches in nave and N. transept with elaborately carved ends.

Cumbria

  1. 18. Brougham (St Ninian, CCT)

    Type 1. 1660–2 for Lady Anne Clifford; complete fittings include canopied family pews and a poor box dated 1666.

  2. 19. Brougham (St Wilfrid)

    Type 5. Refitted in 1840s for Lord Brougham and Vaux; see p. 112.

  3. 20. Murton (St John Evangelist)

    Type 1. 1856 by G Robinson; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit and open benches with simple poppy heads, and with oil lamps attached on poles to bench-ends.

  4. 21. Ravenstonedale (St Oswald)

    Type 5. 1738–44; substantially unaltered interior with six rows of box pews lining N. and S. walls of interior; three-decker pulpit in middle of N. side and panels for Ten Commandments flanked by paintings of Moses and Aaron, and for Creed and Lord’s Prayer flanked by paintings of St Peter and St Paul.

  5. 22. Wreay (St Mary)

    Type 6. 1835–4 for Sarah Losh; original fittings include bought-in foreign glass, altar table of green Italian marble supported on two brass eagles, candlesticks of alabaster in form of lotus-flowers, pulpit and reading-desk of bog oak, both with supporting lecterns, one in form of eagle, the other in form of pelican, and open benches.

Derbyshire

  1. 23. Calke (St Giles, NT)

    Type 6. 1826; completely unaltered interior in which pulpit, reading- and clerk’s desks retain their original hangings; box pews in E. part and open benches in W. part of nave; barrel organ in W. gallery; altar table railed on three sides.

  2. 24. Dale Abbey (All Saints)

    Type 3. Refitted 1634; altar table, incorporating cupboard for altar plate and linen, placed in front of pulpit, reading- and clerk’s desks; box pews in nave and S. aisle, both separated from chancel by screen supporting galleries across most of interior.

  3. 25. Foremark (St Saviour)

    Type 1. 1662 for Sir Francis Burdett; largely original furnishings include chancel screen, three-decker pulpit and box pews; 18th-cent. altar rails and psalm-board; W. gallery dates from 1819.

  4. (p.196) 26. Trusley (All Saints)

    Type 1. 1713; largely original furnishings comprise three-decker pulpit, box pews, baluster font, altar table and rails.

Devon

  1. 27. Clysthydon (St Andrew)

    Type 6. Refitted 1832 and 1856; tall pulpit on N. side of shallow sanctuary; low reading-desk incorporated in box pews on S. side of nave; original stained glass.

  2. 28. Killerton (Holy Evangelists, NT)

    Type 5. 1838–41 by C. R. Cockerell; original fittings include stone altar and stained glass, see p. 110.

  3. 29. Loughwood (Baptist Chapel, NT)

    Type 3. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit on short wall and communion enclosure in front forming platform over baptistery; box pews and gallery across short wall opposite pulpit.

  4. 30. Molland (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1808; substantially unaltered interior with tiered seats for singers at W. end of N. aisle and for children at W. end of nave; see pp. 52, 75–6.

  5. 31. Oldridge Chapel

    Type 1. 1841–3; chapel-of-ease in detached part of parish of St Thomas, Exeter, designed by Tractarian vicar, John Medley, first secretary of Exeter Diocesan Architectural Society; stone pulpit and wooden reading-desk grouped together at NE end of nave; open benches with neo-medieval ends of traditional Devon type; chancel stalled with stone shelf projecting from E. wall to form an altar; some original stained glass.

  6. 32. Parracombe (St Petrock, CCT)

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings; screen and tympanum (latter painted in 1758 with Royal Arms, Ten Commandments, Creed, Lord’s Prayer, and other scriptural texts); box pews with tiered seating for children, musicians, and singers; three-decker pulpit; hat pegs; altar table railed on three sides.

Dorset

  1. 33. Bridport (Old Meeting, Unitarian)

    Type 3. 1794; slightly altered interior retains original pulpit on short wall opposite entrance with communion table railed in below it; three blocks of box pews with seating for singers on each side of communion enclosure; galleries on three sides of interior, used for Sunday school until 1890, retain original seating and desks for teachers.

  2. 34. Chalbury (All Saints)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit, box pews, and tripartite arch, separated by wooden columns, between nave and chancel; W. gallery has been reseated.

  3. (p.197) 35. Charborough (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1837 with imported furnishings for J. S. E. Drax; pulpit built over reading-desk; 17th-cent. stalls in chancel, loose benches in nave; original painted glass; two Flemish altarpieces.

  4. 36. East Lulworth (St Mary, Roman Catholic, EH)

    Type 3. 1786–7 by John Tasker for Thomas Weld; late 19th-cent. accretions removed by H. S. Goodhart-Rendel in 1953; apsidal Greek-cross interior with galleries in three projections and sanctuary in fourth; original organ in W. gallery; family pews in N. and S. galleries; original open benches in central space under dome; original altar with contemporary candlesticks and crucifix of ivory inlaid with lapis lazuli; no pulpit.

  5. 37. Leweston (Holy Trinity)

    Type 1. 1616; completely unaltered interior with canopied pulpit and reading-desk to S. of altar table; open benches with elaborately carved ends; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  6. 38. Portland (St George, CCT)

    Type 6. Refitted 1849–52, see p. 122 and Plate 18.

  7. 39. Puddletown (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1635; original three-decker pulpit, box pews and W. gallery in nave and N. aisle; chancel and N. chapel refurnished 1910–11.

  8. 40. Sutton Waldron (St Bartholomew)

    Type 6. 1846–7 by George Alexander for Tractarian incumbent, Archdeacon Anthony Huxtable, though not fully ecclesiological as chancel unstalled; open benches in nave; much contemporary interior decoration by Owen Jones; see p. 154.

  9. 41. West Parley (All Saints)

    Type 1. Refitted 1841; original box pews and benches with reused 17th-cent. canopied pulpit and reading-desk in nave; chancel refurnished 1896.

  10. 42. Winterborne Tomson (St Andrew, CCT)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings paid for by William Wake, archbishop of Canterbury 1716–37; three-decker pulpit, box pews, altar table and rails, chancel screen and W. gallery made up from parts of pre-Reformation rood loft; church repaired under direction of SPAB in 1929–31.

Durham

  1. 43. Auckland Castle Chapel

    Type 6. Converted from former great hall of castle for Bishop Cosin of Durham in 1661–5; original screen across W. end with stalls on E. side, matching pulpit and reading-desk against middle piers of N. and S. arcades of nave, and stalls against (p.198) outer walls of N. and S. aisles; organ dates from 1699; black and white marble sanctuary pavement laid by Hendrick de Keyser in 1769; reredos, additional seating, and stained glass by Burlison and Grylls installed by C. H. Fowler who restored chapel in 1884.

East Sussex

  1. 44. Lewes (Jireh Chapel, Calvinist)

    Type 3. 1805, enlarged 1823; completely unaltered interior with gallery around four sides; pulpit placed in front of gallery, and entered from it, on short wall opposite entrance; precentor’s desk and communion enclosure in front of pulpit; three blocks of box pews on ground floor and tiered seating in galleries; organ in gallery over entrance; walls lined with hat-pegs.

Essex

  1. 45. Audley End Chapel (EH)

    Type 5. 1786 by John Hobcraft, see p. 109.

  2. 46. Black Chapel

    Type 2. Refitted c.1800, enlarged 1838, see p. 81.

Gloucestershire

  1. 47. Didmarton (St Lawrence)

    Type 4. Early 19th-cent. fittings, see pp. 96–7 and Plate 9a.

  2. 48. Little Washbourne (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; canopied pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, tiered seating at W. end of nave, altar rails and table, latter consisting of a marble slab on a wooden frame.

  3. 49. Oldbury-on-the-Hill (St Arild, CCT)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; high-backed benches on N. side of nave only with three-decker pulpit incorporating miniature seat and desk for parish clerk; altar table and wrought-iron altar rails in chancel; unusual chalice-shaped stone font; walls lined with hat-pegs.

Hampshire

  1. 50. Avington (St Mary)

    Type 1. 1768–71; substantially unaltered interior with canopied pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, marble baluster font, W. gallery with barrel organ of 1830, reredos, chancel pavement of black and white marble, and wrought-iron altar rails.

  2. 51. Boarhunt (St Nicholas)

    Type 1. Refitted 1853; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit, large family pew, open benches in nave and W. gallery; chancel empty apart from altar table and rails.

  3. (p.199) 52. Minstead (All Saints)

    Type 4. Refitted 1792, see pp. 95–6.

  4. 51. Nately Scures (St Swithun)

    Type 6. Refitted 1865 as part of restoration by Anthony Salvin; pre-ecclesiological arrangement with stone pulpit and reading-desk entered directly from small sanctuary; organ in W. gallery.

Hertfordshire

  1. 54. Ashridge College Chapel

    Type 5. 1808–20 by James Wyatt and Sir Jeffrey Wyatville; canopied seats for clergy at W. ends, with matching pulpit and reading-desk at E. ends of N. and S. stall blocks; apsidal sanctuary with carved stone reredos and seats for clergy built into canopied niches on either side of alabaster altar table preserving its original frontal.

  2. 55. Little Hadham (St Cecilia)

    Type 4. 17th-cent. fittings in nave and N. aisle, see p. 95.

  3. 56. Stanstead Abbotts (St James, CCT)

    Type 2. 18th-cent. fittings; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit against S. pier of chancel arch and box pews in nave, chancel, and N. chapel.

Kent

  1. 57. Badlesmere (St Leonard)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, reredos, altar rails, seating for communicants incorporating 15th-cent. bench ends, and tiered seating at W. end of nave.

  2. 58. Fairfield (St Thomas of Canterbury)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings retained by W. D. Caroë when church substantially rebuilt in 1913; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and rails, and framed text boards.

  3. 59. Knowlton (St Clement, CCT)

    Type 2. Refitted 1855; three-decker pulpit in middle of S. wall of nave with family pews to E. and low box pews to W.; contemporary reredos, chancel gates, font with cover, poor box, and iron stove; 18th-cent. altar table and rails.

  4. 60. Stelling (St Mary)

    Type 4. Refitted 1792, see p. 98.

Lancashire

  1. 61. Barnoldswick (St Mary-le-Gill)

    Type 2. Refitted 1836; mix of 17th-cent. and early 19th-cent. fittings with three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave, box pews, altar table and rails, and (p.200) unusual oval-shaped Royal Arms of William IV and octagonal boards inscribed with Creed and Lord’s Prayer; W. gallery taken down in 1957.

  2. 62. Goodshaw (Baptist Chapel, EH)

    Type 2/3. c. 1800; square interior with canopied pulpit in middle of entrance wall and pew for communicants and singers in front; five blocks of box pews arranged to face pulpit; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered box pews replicating arrangement in body of chapel; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  3. 63. Hoole (St Michael)

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings; canopied pulpit, reading-desk, poppy-headed box pews, and galleries across N. and W. walls of nave with tiered seating; chancel has been refurnished.

  4. 64. Pilling (St John Baptist, CCT)

    Type 1. 1717–23, partly refitted 1812–13; pulpit and reading-desk to S. of altar table and rails; seating provided by mix of box pews and benches; galleries with tiered seating across N. and W. walls, the former lined with hat-pegs.

  5. 65. Rivington (Unitarian Chapel)

    Type 2. 1703 for Lord Willoughby of Parham, a prominent local dissenter; box pews arranged in irregular blocks with family pew and pew for singers; pulpit in middle of long wall opposite entrance with communion table railed in below it.

  6. 66. Slaidburn (St Andrew)

    Type 2. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings, see p. 83.

Leicestershire

  1. 67. King’s Norton (St John Baptist)

    Type 3. 1757–75 by John Wing the younger for William Fortrey; completely unaltered interior with centrally placed three-decker pulpit at E. end of nave, box pews, W gallery, altar table railed on three sides, reredos, and stalls for communicants in chancel.

  2. 68. Lubenham (All Saints)

    Type 1. Refitted 1812; pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in nave and N. aisle; chancel has been refurnished.

  3. 69. Stapleford (St Mary Magdalene, CCT)

    Type 5. 1783 by George Richardson for Earl of Harborough, see pp. 34, 39, 110.

  4. 70. Staunton Harold (Holy Trinity, NT)

    Type 1. 1653–65 for Sir Robert Shirley, see pp. 68–9.

  5. 71. Withcote Chapel (CCT)

    Type 5. Refitted 1744; pulpit and reading desk at E. ends, respectively, of N. and S. stall blocks; organ and seats for singers at W end; chancel, separated from nave (p.201) by wrought-iron railings, has contemporary altar table and reredos; windows filled with 16th-cent. stained glass.

Lincolnshire

  1. 72. Belton House Chapel (NT)

    Type 5. 1685 for Sir John Brownlow; family pew in W. gallery; stalls along N. and S. walls with pulpit and reading-desk adjacent to altar, which has original reredos.

  2. 73. Goltho (St George, CCT)

    Type 2. 18th-cent. fittings; pulpit and reading-desk in middle of N. wall of nave, W. gallery, box pews, benches, and altar table railed on three sides.

  3. 74. Hackthorn (St Michael)

    Type 6. 1849–50; pre-ecclesiological interior with open benches, pulpit, reading-desk, original altar table, family pew in W. gallery, and original stained glass.

  4. 75. Hannah (St Andrew)

    Type 1. 1753–5; substantially unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit, box pews, font incorporated in a pew, reredos formed around Venetian E. window, and altar table with bow-fronted rails.

  5. 76. Haugham (All Saints, CCT)

    Type 1. 1840 by William Nicholson; completely unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, open benches, original painted glass in E. window, and altar table with original frontal.

  6. 77. Langton-by-Partney (St Peter and St Paul)

    Type 5. c.1725; canopied three-decker pulpit in middle of S. stall block; W. gallery; original reredos with altar table railed on three sides.

  7. 78. Lincoln Castle Chapel

    Type 3. 1845–6, seep. 85.

  8. 79. Mareham-on-the-Hill (All Saints)

    Type 1. Refitted 1804; pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in nave; benches for children in chancel.

  9. 80. Stragglethorpe (St Michael)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews and loose benches in nave; chancel empty apart from altar table and rails.

  10. 81. Well (St Margaret)

    Type 5. 1733; three-decker pulpit in middle of S. stall block; reredos built around Venetian E. window; original altar table, rails, and wooden baluster font.

(p.202) Norfolk

  1. 82. Bircham Newton (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1858; pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews with poppy-heads supporting candle sconces.

  2. 83. Bylaugh (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1809–10; three-decker pulpit, box pews, reredos, and wrought-iron altar rails; fireplaces in transepts formerly used to provide heating for whole church.

  3. 84. East Walton (St Mary)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit and box pews in nave; chancel has been refurnished.

  4. 85. Reymerston (St Peter)

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit and medieval benches in nave, box pews in N. and S. aisles; family pews, reredos, and carved Flemish altar rails of c.1700 in chancel with 16th-cent. Flemish stained glass in E. window.

  5. 86. Thurning (St Andrew)

    Type 1. Refitted 1825 with redundant furnishings of 1742 discarded by Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, in 1823; slightly altered arrangement with box pews facing S. in N. aisle and loose benches facing E. in nave; three-decker pulpit, and altar table railed on three sides.

  6. 87. Warham St Mary (St Mary Magdalene)

    Type 1. Refitted c.1800; three-decker pulpit, box pews, baluster font, altar rails, and windows filled with imported stained glass, mostly from Flemish or German sources.

  7. 88. Wilby (All Saints)

    Type 2. Refitted 1637; chancel separated from nave by low gated screen, with three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave; seating provided by mix of benches and box pews; W. gallery.

Northamptonshire

  1. 89. Ashby St Ledgers (St Leodigarius)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit and family pews at E. end of nave, medieval benches in W. part of nave, box pews in N. and S. aisles with large pew for musicians and singers at W. end of N. aisle; painted glass of 1829 in E. window; chancel empty apart from altar table and rails.

  2. 90. East Carlton (St Peter)

    Type 1. 1788 by John Wing the younger; interior, slightly altered in 1860, retains original pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in nave, and family pews in shallow chancel.

  3. (p.203) 91. Easton Neston (St Mary)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; chancel screen has been removed but interior otherwise intact with three-decker pulpit, box pews and seats for churchwardens and singers, together with 18th-cent. organ, at W. end of nave.

Northumberland

  1. 92. Chipchase Chapel

    Type 2. 18th-cent. fittings; interior, slightly altered in 1852, retains original canopied pulpit and reading-desk in middle of S. wall, and box pews.

North Yorkshire

  1. 93. Aldfield (St Lawrence)

    Type 4. 1783; substantially unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit and box pews, see Plate 9b.

  2. 94. Allerton Mauleverer (St Martin, CCT)

    Type 1. 1745–6; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, open benches with poppy-heads, original stained glass by William Peckitt in E. window, and large Commandment Board, incorporating picture of Moses and Aaron, over chancel arch.

  3. 95. Coxwold (St Michael)

    Type 1. Refitted 1774; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and W. gallery in nave; unusual altar rails running full length of chancel.

  4. 96. Crathorne (St Mary, Roman Catholic)

    Type 3. 1834; largely unaltered interior retains original altar table and rails, rere-dos incorporating tabernacle and statue niches, tripartite arch separating chancel from nave, box pews, and W. gallery with tiered seating; no pulpit.

  5. 97. Crayke (St Cuthbert)

    Type 6. Refitted 1637; pulpit, reading-desk, benches (tiered at W. end of nave), font cover, and chancel chairs.

  6. 98. Fylingdales (St Stephen, CCT)

    Type 2. 1821–2; minor alterations in 1946 when organ installed in W. gallery; otherwise perfect early 19th-cent. interior, see p. 79 and Plate 5.

  7. 99. Hunmanby (All Saints)

    Type 6. Refitted 1845–53; pulpit on N. side of chancel arch with reading- and clerk’s desks on S. side; nave and chancel fitted with low box pews; altar table with bow-fronted rails.

  8. 100. Ingleby Arnecliffe (All Saints)

    Type 1. 1821; three-decker pulpit and baptism pew, incorporating font, at E. end of nave; numbered box pews with tiered seating for singers, and castellated organ case at W. end of nave.

  9. (p.204) 101. Lead (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 1. Refitted 1784; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit adjacent to altar and seating provided by open benches.

  10. 102. Leyburn (St Peter and St Paul, Roman Catholic)

    Type 3. 1835; largely unaltered interior with three blocks of low box pews lacking central passageway; deep W. gallery with original organ; original stained glass in E. window; no pulpit.

  11. 103. Red House Chapel

    Type 5. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings; ante-chapel has benches with candle-sconces facing E.; main chapel stalled along N. and S. walls with paintings of Ten Commandments, incorporating figures of Moses and Aaron, and cherubs; chancel paved with marble, and altar table, railed on three sides, raised on two steps.

  12. 104. Roecliffe (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 5. 1843–4 by c. H. Sharp; stalled along N., S. and W. walls with loose benches in central space; 17th-cent. pulpit and reading-desk, and large family pew made up from imported Dutch and German carved woodwork; shallow chancel, with altar table, marble pavement, and original stained glass in E. window, raised five steps above level of nave.

  13. 105. Weston (All Saints)

    Type 4. Refitted 1806–19; interior made T-plan by formation of vestry at W. end of N. aisle; box pews in nave, N. aisle, and W. part of chancel; three-decker pulpit in SE corner of nave with pew for singers and musicians in NE corner; family pew with fireplace, table, and chairs in N. chapel.

  14. 106. Whitby (St Mary)

    Type 4. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings, see pp. 39–40, 101.

Nottinghamshire

  1. 107. Elston Chapel (CCT)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, W. gallery, and hat-pegs.

  2. 108. Teversal (St Catherine)

    Type 1. Refitted 1675; pulpit, reading-desk, square altar table and rails, box pews (including miniature ones for children in chancel), baptism pew incorporating font, and canopied Molyneux pew.

  3. 109. Winkburn (St John of Jerusalem)

    Type 2. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; nave and chancel separated by tripartite wooden division supporting tympanum painted with Royal Arms in 1764; canopied pulpit and reading-desk placed in middle of church, and raised family pew opposite, with box pews to E. facing W. and those to W facing E.

(p.205) Oxfordshire

  1. 110. Besselsleigh (St Lawrence)

    Type 2. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; nave and chancel separated by tympanum with decorative pendants; square altar table with barley-sugar legs; box pews in chancel, benches in nave; canopied three-decker pulpit in middle of church on S. side; W. gallery has been refurnished.

  2. 111. Chislehampton (St Katherine, CCT)

    Type 2. 1762–3; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave, box pews, W. gallery, altar table railed on three sides, original reredos, and benches for communicants.

  3. 112. Cornbury Park Chapel

    Type 5. Late 17th-cent. fittings in poor state of repair after many years disuse; W. screen supports family pew in gallery above; pulpit and reading-desk at E. ends, respectively, of N. and S. stall blocks; altar table railed on three sides raised on pavement of two steps; painting, which formed central part of reredos, has been removed; elaborate plastered ceiling.

  4. 113. Cote (Baptist Chapel, HCT)

    Type 3. Refitted 1859; pulpit in middle of short wall opposite entrance with double staircase and precentor’s desk in front; three blocks of box pews with large communion pew built over baptistery at pulpit end of central block; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating and organ over entrance.

  5. 114. Milton House Chapel (Roman Catholic)

    Type 3. Late 18th-cent. fittings; original painted altar complete with tabernacle and candlesticks; benches designed for kneeling rather than sitting; no pulpit; windows filled with imported 14th-cent. English and 16th-cent. Dutch stained glass.

  6. 115. Rycote (St Michael, EH)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings, see pp. 40, 181, and Plate 2.

  7. 116. Shorthampton (All Saints)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and rails, hat-pegs and peg for minister’s preaching gown attached to chancel arch.

  8. 117. Stonor (Holy Trinity, Roman Catholic)

    Type 3. Refitted 1796–1800 by James Thorpe and restored to original 18th-cent. condition in 1960; slightly altered interior retains original altar table and rails, benches with candle-holders, ‘Gothick’ sanctuary chairs, plaster vaulted ceiling, and painted glass by Francis Egerton; family pew in W. gallery; no pulpit.

  9. 118. Waterperry (St Mary)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; canopied pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and large pew for musicians and singers, complete with music stand.

  10. (p.206) 119. Wheatfield (St Andrew)

    Type 1. 1745; unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and rails, original reredos, and seats for communicants in chancel.

Shropshire

  1. 120. Halston Chapel

    Type 5. Refitted c.1725; completely unaltered interior, see p. 110.

  2. 121. Heath Chapel

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and altar table, railed on three sides.

  3. 122. Langley Chapel (EH)

    Type 6. Early 17th-cent. fittings; original interior restored by SPAB in 1900, see p. 32.

  4. 123. Leebotwood (St Mary)

    Type 2. Refitted 1776 and 1829; chancel, with family pews and altar table, railed on three sides, separated from nave by tripartite division of wooden columns; pulpit, reading-desk, and font in middle of S. wall of nave, box pews, and W. gallery.

  5. 124. Longnor (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1723 and c.1840; W. gallery approached by external staircase; baptism pew, incorporating font, in middle of N. wall of nave with pulpit and reading-desk at E. end; box pews in nave with family pews and benches for communicants in chancel; altar table railed on three sides.

  6. 125. More (St Peter)

    Type 6. 1845–6; largely unaltered interior, see p. 153.

Somerset

  1. 126. Babington (St Margaret)

    Type 1. 1748–50; unaltered interior, see p. 70.

  2. 127. Bruton (Sexey’s Hospital Chapel)

    Type 5. 1638; stalls with carved fronts along N., S., and W. walls; canopied pulpit and reading-desk on S. side of altar.

  3. 128. Hardington (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in E. part of nave with open space at W. end; chancel empty apart from altar table and rails.

  4. 129. Holcombe (St Andrew, CCT)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; unaltered nave with three-decker pulpit, W. gallery, and mix of box pews and open benches; chancel has been refurnished.

  5. (p.207) 130. Middle Lambrook (Independent Chapel)

    Type 2. 1727–9; slightly altered interior with pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long entrance wall and communion pew to one side; four blocks of box pews on ground floor; galleries around three sides of interior with tiered seating, those for choir facing pulpit.

  6. 131. Sutton Mallet Chapel (CCT)

    Type 1. 1829 by Richard Carver; completely unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in E. part of nave, and open benches, font, and gallery in W part.

  7. 132. Wyke Champflower (Holy Trinity)

    Type 1. 1623–4; nave and chancel separated by tympanum; rare stone pulpit but no evidence for there ever having been a reading-desk; box pews.

Staffordshire

  1. 133. Alstonefleld (St Peter)

    Type 1. Refitted 1637–9; pulpit, reading-desk, and complete set of box pews in nave and both aisles; chancel refurnished 1875.

  2. 134. Blore (St Bartholomew)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, and mix of box pews and benches in nave and N. aisle; 16th-cent. choir stalls adapted to serve as seats for communicants.

  3. 135. Elkstone (St John Baptist)

    Type 1. 1786–8; three-decker pulpit on N. side of altar; box pews; W. gallery projecting further E. on N. than S. side (former side fitted with tiered benches, latter has seats for musicians and singers).

  4. 136. Ingestre (St Mary)

    Type 1. 1676 for Walter Chetwynd, possibly by Sir Christopher Wren; slightly altered interior retains original canopied pulpit, reading-desk, tripartite chancel screen, and other fittings, see Plate 3.

Suffolk

  1. 137. Badley (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 2. 17th-cent. fittings; seating provided by mix of box pews and 16th-cent. benches with pulpit and reading-desk in middle of seating.

  2. 138. Gislingham (St Mary)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave; seating provided by mix of box pews and 15th-cent. benches; chancel has been refurnished.

  3. 139. Ipswich (Old Meeting, Unitarian)

    Type 2. 1699–1700 by local carpenter, Joseph Clarke; well-preserved interior with (p.208) pulpit and precentor’s desk on long wall opposite entrance; open space in middle of chapel formerly occupied by long communion table; box pews arranged against side walls; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered box pews; organ moved from gallery to ground floor of chapel against entrance wall in 1885.

  4. 140. Kedington (St Peter and St Paul)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; largely unaltered interior with earliest known three-decker pulpit (complete with hour-glass stand and later stand for minister’s wig) and chancel screen of 1619, box pews, tiered benches for children at W. end of N. and S. aisles, and semicircular gallery for musicians and singers at W. end of nave.

  5. 141. Ramsholt (All Saints)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit and reading-desk in middle of S. wall of nave with box pews arranged to face them.

  6. 142. Rushbrooke (St Nicholas)

    Type 5. Refitted c. 1840 with imported medieval woodwork; nave and chancel separated by tympanum, see Plate 12b.

  7. 143. Shelland (King Charles the Martyr)

    Type 1. 1767; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and rails, chancel gates, and tiered seating for singers, incorporating early 19th-cent. organ, at W. end of nave.

  8. 144. Walpole (Independent Chapel, HCT)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; slightly altered interior with canopied pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall opposite entrance; seating comprises mix of box pews and open benches; wide central space occupied by long communion table; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

Surrey

  1. 145. Farnham Castle Chapel

    Type 5. 1677–84 for Bishop Morley of Winchester; stalls along N., S. and W. walls with canopied pulpit and reading-desk on N. wall; sanctuary has been refurnished.

  2. 146. Gatton (St Andrew)

    Type 5. Refitted 1834 with imported furnishings for Lord Monson, see pp. 40, 112.

Warwickshire

  1. 147. Arbury Hall Chapel

    Type 5. 1678 for Sir Richard Newdigate, partly refitted 1787 for Sir Roger Newdigate; bought-in 16th-cent. Flemish stained glass and altar triptych; square altar table retains original frontal; seating provided by domestic chairs; organ (still in original packing cases) not installed until 1992.

  2. (p.209) 148. Charlecote (St Leonard)

    Type 6. 1851–3 by John Gibson for Mrs M. E. Lucy in memory of her husband; pre-ecclesiological arrangement with altar table raised only one step above level of chancel and canopied stalls in chancel serving as seats for family and guests; nave fitted with open benches with pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of chancel arch; contemporary stained glass by Michael O’Connor and Thomas Willement.

  3. 149. Compton Wynyates Chapel

    Type 2. Late 17th-cent. fittings, see p. 80.

  4. 150. Long Lawford (St John Evangelist)

    Type 6. 1839 by William Walker; unaltered interior with pulpit on S. side of chancel arch and reading- and clerk’s desks on N. side; open benches in nave; shallow chancel with original painted glass in E. window.

  5. 151. Loxley (St Nicholas)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; substantially unaltered interior with box pews and pulpit placed high up in SE corner of nave and entered through wall from vestry; no evidence of there ever having been a reading-desk.

  6. 152. Stoneleigh Abbey Chapel

    Type 6. Early 18th-cent. fittings; completely unaltered interior with altar table raised on marble pavement and railed on three sides; altar flanked by pulpit on N. and reading-desk on S. sides, both retaining original cushions and candle sconces; box pews, also with original candle sconces, face E.; family pew and organ in W. gallery.

West Sussex

  1. 153. Chichester (Providence Chapel, Calvinist)

    Type 3. 1809; pulpit on short wall opposite entrance entered directly from upper floor of minister’s lodging; precentor’s desk and combined communion table and music desk below pulpit surrounded on four sides by double row of seats for communicants and singers; open benches in body of chapel and gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

  2. 154. Chichester (St John Evangelist, CCT)

    Type 3. 1812–13 by John Elmes, see pp. 106–7.

  3. 155. Greatham (No dedication)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk and open benches facing E.

  4. 156. Parham (St Peter)

    Type 1. Refitted c.1820; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, chancel screen, and family pew, complete with fireplace and separate entrance, in S. transept.

  5. (p.210) 157. Pet worth House Chapel (NT)

    Type 5. 1690–2; unaltered interior with pulpit in middle of N. stall block and family pew in W. gallery; stone altar table with original rails, painted reredos, and heraldic glass in E. window.

  6. 158. Stansted (St Paul)

    Type 1. 1812–15 for Lewis Way; nave retains original pulpit, reading-desk, separate lectern, benches and W. gallery; chancel refurnished by H. S. Goodhart-Rendel in 1926.

  7. 159. Warminghurst (Holy Sepulchre, CCT)

    Type 1. Refitted c.1710; nave and chancel separated by screen and tympanum painted with Royal Arms; original pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and rails, see Plate 4.

Wiltshire

  1. 160. Corsham (Monk’s Chapel, Independent)

    Type 2. Early 18th-cent. fittings; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall opposite entrance; large communion enclosure in middle of chapel with contemporary communion table; box pews around external walls; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered benches, those for choir facing pulpit, and hat-pegs attached to gallery fronts.

  2. 161. Derry Hill (Little Zoar Chapel, Baptist)

    Type 3. 1814; unaltered interior with pulpit in middle of short wall opposite gallery and communion table, built over baptistery in front of pulpit; seating provided by open benches; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  3. 162. Fugglestone (St Peter)

    Type 6. Refitted 1840; retains original pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and W. gallery; chancel refurnished 1861.

  4. 163. Littlecote Chapel

    Type 3. Mid-17th-cent. fittings; slightly altered interior retaining pulpit, reading-and clerk’s desks against E. wall; altar table formerly in front of pulpit has been removed; seating provided by bobbin-headed benches; gallery around three sides of interior.

  5. 164. Mildenhall (St John Baptist)

    Type 6. Refitted 1815–16, see pp. 121–2 and Plate 17b.

  6. 165. Old Dilton (St Mary, CCT)

    Type 2. 18th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit in middle of S. wall of nave, box pews grafted on to medieval benches, and W. gallery, see Plate 6a.

  7. 166. Swallowcliffe (St Peter)

    Type 6. 1842–3 by G. G. Scott and W. B. Moffatt; largely unaltered pre-ecclesiological (p.211) interior with stone pulpit and reading-desk, open benches in nave, and unstalled chancel.

Worcestershire

  1. 167. Atch Lench (Baptist Chapel)

    Type 3. 1829; slightly altered interior retaining original pulpit, on short wall opposite entrance, communion table, and numbered box pews; gallery across entrance has had its tiered seating removed.

  2. 168. Strensham (St John Baptist)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; largely unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, altar table with barley-sugar legs, and W. gallery constructed from parts of former rood screen; seating provided by a mix of box pews and 16th-cent. benches.

  3. 169. Wickhamford (St John Baptist)

    Type 1. Refitted 1661; restoration of 1949 under direction of G. C. Lees Milne retained three-decker pulpit, box pews, W. gallery, and tympanum bearing Royal Arms of Charles II.

  4. 170. Worcester (St Swithun, CCT)

    Type 1. 1734–6; substantially unaltered interior with canopied three-decker pulpit, corporation pew with mayoral chair and sword-rest, complete set of box pews, W. gallery, and altar table comprising marble top on a wrought-iron frame.

Section 2: English Unitary Authorities

Bath and North-East Somerset

  1. 171. Cameley (St James, CCT)

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. to early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, mix of box pews and benches, painted texts, reredos, altar table and rails, seats for communicants, W. gallery (1711), and S. gallery (1819).

Bradford

  1. 172. Tong (St James)

    Type 1. 1727–8; substantially unaltered interior, repaired in 1979–80, with canopied three decker pulpit, box pews, altar table and rails, W. gallery, and Tempest pew, complete with fireplace.

Bristol

  1. 173. New Room (Wesleyan Methodist)

    Type 3. 1739–48, see pp. 85–6.

Bury

  1. 174. Ainsworth (Unitarian Chapel)

    Type 2. Refitted 1845; slightly altered interior with pulpit and precentor’s desk in (p.212) middle of one of long walls, but entrance on one of short walls; three blocks of box pews; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

Darlington

  1. 175. Haughton-le-Skerne (St Andrew)

    Type 6. Refitted 1662; matching canopied pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of chancel arch; gated benches in nave; chancel refurnished 1895.

East Riding of Yorkshire

  1. 176. Burton Constable Chapel (Roman Catholic)

    Type 3. 1844; converted from former ballroom; original painted altar, velvet-covered chairs and benches, prie-dieux, and windows filled with 18th-19th-cent. stained glass, including some by William Peckitt of York.

  2. 177. Marton (Holy Sacrament, Roman Catholic)

    Type 1. 1789 for William Constable; substantially unaltered interior with box pews under W. gallery, benches, pulpit entered from sanctuary, sarcophagus-shaped wooden altar, and original Stations of the Cross.

  3. 178. Ruston Parva (St Nicholas)

    Type 1. 1832; three-decker pulpit and box pews in nave; chancel has been refurnished.

  4. 179. Tickton (St Paul)

    Type 6. 1843–4; slightly altered pre-ecclesiological interior with original pulpit, reading-desk, and open benches; stone altar table and rails.

Gateshead

  1. 180. Gibside Chapel (NT)

    Type 3. Built as mausoleum for George Bowes by James Paine 1760–9 and fitted out as chapel 1812, see pp. 85, 102.

Herefordshire

  1. 181. Clodock (St Clydog)

    Type 1. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; canopied three-decker pulpit, three blocks of box pews in wide nave, altar table railed on three sides, seats for communicants in chancel and W. gallery with seats for singers on N. side and benches grouped around music stand for musicians on S. side; Royal Arms, Ten Commandments, and Lord’s Prayer painted on N. wall of nave.

  2. 182. Shobdon (St John Evangelist)

    Type 1. 1752–6 for Hon. Richard Bateman, see pp. 111–12.

  3. 183. Stoke Edith (St Mary)

    Type 1. 1740–2; slightly altered interior with three-decker pulpit, box pews, and font comprising marble bowl on wrought-iron stand.

(p.213) Kingston-upon-Hull

  1. 184. Charterhouse Chapel

    Type 5. 1778–80; interior, slightly altered when organ installed in 1902, has pulpit suspended from middle of long wall opposite entrance and entered through wall from vestry; reading-desk below pulpit, forming part of bow-fronted box pew; altar table raised on three steps and originally railed on three sides.

  2. 185. Trinity House Chapel

    Type 1. 1839–43 by H. F. Lockwood; unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, and organ at E. end of S. block of box pews, and stalls for Board of Trinity House, complete with velvet cushions, at E. end of N. block facing S.; W. gallery with tiered box pews; apsidal sanctuary with bow-fronted altar rails, altar table, in form of marble slab supported by gilded eagle, and reredos comprising two marble tablets inscribed with Ten Commandments.

Kirklees

  1. 186. New Mill (Lydgate Chapel, Unitarian)

    Type 3. Refitted 1848; slightly altered interior with tall canopied pulpit on short wall opposite entrance and vested communion table with bow-fronted rails in front; box pews, those to side of pulpit facing inwards, and gallery across entrance with seats for singers, complete with music stands, and later organ.

Leeds

  1. 187. Bramhope Chapel

    Type 2. 1649; substantially unaltered interior repaired by Wharfedale Rural District Council in 1964–5; pulpit and reading-desk in middle of N. wall of nave; seating provided by mix of benches and box pews; early 19th-cent. stone altar table with seats for communicants on each side.

Liverpool

  1. 188. Toxteth (Ancient Chapel, Unitarian)

    Type 2. Refitted 1774; slightly altered interior with pulpit in middle of one of long walls, box pews lined with green baize, and gallery around three sides with tiered benches.

  2. 189. Toxteth (St Clement)

    Type 3. 1841; slightly altered galleried interior, with some seating removed, but retaining tall pulpit, reached by iron spiral staircase, and reading-desk placed directly in front of shallow polygonal sanctuary with original altar table and rails, sanctuary chairs, and tall panels for Ten Commandments, Creed, and Lord’s Prayer; three blocks of box pews lacking central passageway.

London Borough of Greenwich

  1. 190. Morden College Chapel

    Type 6. 1695–1700; canopied pulpit and low reading-desk on opposite sides of (p.214) altar which retains original reredos; uniform box pews facing E.; W. gallery with original organ.

London Borough of Richmond upon Thames

  1. 191. Ham House Chapel (NT)

    Type 5. Late 17th-cent. fittings; stalls along N. and S. walls with matching reading-desks at E. ends; altar table, on marble pavement, retains original carpet and tapestry dossal.

  2. 192. Petersham (St Peter)

    Type 4. Refitted 1839–40, see pp. 98–100. London Borough of Tower Hamlets

  3. 193. Stepney (St George, Lutheran, HCT)

    Type 3. 1762–3; galleried interior with three blocks of box pews facing pulpit, see p. 27.

Milton Keynes

  1. 194. Gayhurst (St Peter)

    Type 1. 1728; unaltered interior with canopied pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, altar table and wrought-iron rails; reredos incorporating seven imitation candles.

Newcastle upon Tyne

  1. 195. Trinity House Chapel

    Type 6. Refitted 1841; largely 17th-cent. furnishings with pulpit and reading-desk, on opposite sides of interior, in middle of box pews, with pews to E. of them facing W.; altar table placed between pews at E. end with semi-circular rail in front of it.

Peterborough

  1. 196. Burghley House Chapel

    Type 6. Refitted 1828; altar table railed on three sides with pulpit on one side and reading-desk on other; seating provided by domestic chairs.

Redcar and Cleveland

  1. 197. Kirkleatham (Turner’s Hospital Chapel)

    Type 5. 1742; two rows of stalls along N. and S. walls with square reading-desk at E. end of each block; shallow gallery around three sides of interior, stepped over entrance; original altar table and wrought-iron rails.

  2. 198. Skelton-in-Cleveland (All Saints, CCT)

    Type 2. 1785; unaltered interior with canopied three-decker pulpit in middle of S. wall of nave opposite N. transept, which contains family pew, complete with fireplace and barrel organ; box pews arranged to face pulpit in nave; deep W. gallery with tiered seating; chancel empty apart from altar table and rails.

(p.215) Rutland

  1. 199. Brooke (St Peter)

    Type 1. Late 16th-cent. fittings; substantially unaltered interior with canopied pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews; chancel stalled for communicants.

  2. 200. Teigh (Holy Trinity)

    Type 5. 1782 by George Richardson for Earl of Harborough, see pp. 34, 110, and Plate 11.

Sheffield

  1. 201. Beauchief (St Thomas of Canterbury)

    Type 1. c. 1660; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit on N. side of altar, box pews, and rare 18th-cent. psalm board.

Swindon

  1. 202. Inglesham (St John Baptist, CCT)

    Type 1. 16th–17th-cent. fittings; unaltered interior repaired under direction of SPAB by J. T. Micklethwaite in 1888–9; canopied pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews.

Tameside

  1. 203. Ashton-under-Lyne (St Michael)

    Type 2. 1840–5; important pre-ecclesiological interior slightly altered when shallow chancel refitted in 1872; tall pulpit with separate reading- and clerk’s desks in middle of N. side of nave; low box pews with poppy-heads, those to E. of pulpit facing W.; square pews for churchwardens, complete with original staves, and bread cupboard at W. end of nave; galleries, with carved fronts and tiered seating, across N. and S. aisles, and across W. end of nave with organ and seats for singers.

Telford and Wrekin

  1. 204. Stirchley (St James)

    Type 1. Refitted 1838; minor alterations in 1919 when gallery across N. aisle, which originally projected into nave, reduced in size and chancel refurnished; original three-decker pulpit, box pews, W. gallery, and tiered seating in N. gallery.

Trafford

  1. 205. Dunham Massey Chapel (NT)

    Type 5. Refitted c.1710; altar table raised on pavement of black and white marble with reredos incorporating panel of blue silk damask embellished with IHS monogram; reading-desk to one side of altar space; original silk altar carpet and silk lining of family pew at W. end replaced by exact replicas in 1906; stalls and benches along N. and S. walls.

  2. (p.216) 206. Halebarns (Hale Chapel, Unitarian)

    Type 2. 1723; interior altered in 1906 when galleries across short end walls removed; original fittings include canopied pulpit in middle of one of long walls, with communion table railed in below it, box pews and raised family pews against short end walls.

West Berkshire

  1. 207. Hamstead Marshall (St Mary)

    Type 1. Late 17th-cent. fittings; restoration of 1929 by Sir Charles Nicholson preserved canopied pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and W. gallery.

  2. 208. Wickham (St Swithun)

    Type 6. 1845–9 by Benjamin Ferrey; little altered pre-ecclesiological interior with open benches, facing inwards in N. and S. aisles, pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of chancel arch, and unstalled chancel.

Wigan

  1. 209. Atherton (Chowbent Chapel, Unitarian)

    Type 2. 1721–2; interior slightly altered when chapel extended to house new organ in 1901; three-decker pulpit in middle of long wall opposite entrance with communion table in front; box pews arranged in five blocks; galleries around three sides of interior, all except organ gallery retaining original tiered seating.

York

  1. 210. Goodramgate (Holy Trinity, CCT)

    Type 1. 18th-cent. fittings; unaltered interior with box pews, pulpit, and reading-desk of 1785 and altar table of 1721, railed on three sides and retaining its original carpet and reredos.

Section 3: Scottish Unitary Authorities

Aberdeen

  1. 211. St Nicholas West (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. 1752–5 by James Gibbs; slightly altered interior with original canopied pulpit in middle of nave and railed pew for elders on opposite side, box pews in nave and N. aisle and galleries around four sides, one containing pew for Lord Provost and members of City Council; late 19th-cent. organ and communion table.

Aberdeenshire

  1. 212. Bourtie (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2/3. 1806; square interior retains original canopied pulpit with bracket for baptismal bowl, precentor’s desk, penitent’s platform, manse pew, and open benches; gallery across entrance wall with tiered seating; collecting shoes, earliest dating from 1671.

  2. (p.217) 213. Glenbuchat (St Peter, Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. Refitted 1792, see pp. 182–3.

  3. 214. Kinneff (St Anthony, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1876; unaltered interior with pulpit in middle of long wall and contemporary communion table in front; box pews for manse and Sunday school; other seating provided by open benches; pulpit, communion table, and gallery front (in transept opposite pulpit) retain original velvet coverings.

Argyll and Bute

  1. 215. Ardchattan (St Modan, Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1836; slightly altered interior with canopied pulpit in middle of short wall opposite entrance, with bracket holding baptismal bowl and precentor’s desk in form of miniature pulpit; box pews for elders on each side of pulpit; long communion table runs down middle of church with benches on either side; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

  2. 216. Craignish (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. 1826; slightly altered interior with pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall; benches on three sides of central liturgical space, and gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

  3. 217. Kilberry (St Berach, Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. 1821; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall, and benches ranged around them on three sides, some with tables; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating.

Dumfries and Galloway

  1. 218. Crossmichael (St Michael, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1749–51, partly refitted 1822–5; slightly altered interior with canopied family pews at each end of cross aisle and pulpit facing transept, its backboard incorporating door to belfry behind; lofts in all three projections with tiered seating; some box pews fitted with tables.

  2. 219. Durisdeer (St Cuthbert, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1825 and slightly reordered in c.1870 when pulpit moved to middle of cross aisle; seating provided by mix of box pews and benches; two rows of table pews in aisle opposite pulpit; lofts in all three projections, one containing Queensberry pew with two-storey retiring room and sessions house behind; aisle behind pulpit contains monument by John van Nost to second Duke of Queensberry who died in 1711; brackets for baptismal bowl and sermon glass attached to pulpit.

  3. 220. Kirkcudbright (St Cuthbert, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1835–8 by William Burn; interior slightly altered in 1886 when apsidal vestry and organ chamber built behind canopied pulpit and precentor’s desk, in (p.218) middle of long wall; open benches facing pulpit in all three projections with tiered box pews in all three lofts.

East Lothian

  1. 221. Spott (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1809; 18th-cent. pulpit, with bracket for baptismal bowl, from earlier church; box pews in all three projections facing pulpit, some with movable partitions to form communion tables, but no gallery or lofts.

  2. 222. Yester (St Cuthbert, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1830; box pews and lofts in all three projections, one containing Tweeddale pew with retiring room and separate external entrance; 17th-cent. pulpit in middle of long wall has tester surmounted by golden dove and bracket for baptismal bowl; minor alterations in 1895 when pulpit further embellished with carved side panels, and communion enclosure with contemporary communion table placed in front of it.

Fife

  1. 223. Ceres (Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1805–6 by Alexander Leslie; slightly altered interior with canopied pulpit in middle of short wall opposite entrance; box pews angled against long walls to focus on pulpit with single row of table pews on each side of central passageway; curved gallery with tiered seating around three sides of interior; pewter baptismal bowl of 1752 on later wooden stand.

  2. 224. Cults (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. Refitted 1835; pulpit in middle of long wall, box pews (some fitted with tables) and gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating and family pew in corner adjacent to belfry; iron stand for former baptismal bowl.

  3. 225. Kilmany (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. Refitted 1860; pulpit of 1768, with brackets for baptismal bowl and hour glass, in middle of long wall; seating provided by mix of long box pews, two of which convert into communion tables, and benches; original brass lamps attached to walls, pulpit, and seating.

Highland

  1. 226. Croick (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1825–7 by James Smith to a design by William Thomson; best preserved of sixteen churches in Highland erected under parliamentary Act of 1823; canopied pulpit, with bracket supporting ceramic baptismal bowl, and precentor’s desk in middle of long entrance wall; box pews either side of pulpit but other seating provided by open benches; long communion table across middle of cross aisle with benches on each side; no galleries.

  2. (p.219) 227. Edderton (Free Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1851; former parish church acquired by Free Church after Disruption; canopied pulpit of 1794 within bobbin-headed enclosure incorporating simple desk for precentor; benches throughout, some converting to form communion tables; lofts in all three projections.

  3. 228. Eriboll (Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1804; unaltered wood-lined interior carefully restored by Eriboll estate after period of disuse; pulpit in middle of short wall with door in backboard to minister’s vestry; seating provided by straight-backed benches raked towards entrance.

  4. 229. Golspie (St Andrew, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1736–7 extended by additional aisle to make cruciform interior in 1750–1; extensively repaired in 1953–4, see p. 183; Sutherland pew with retiring room behind and separate external staircase in aisle opposite original canopied pulpit; lofts of 1849 with tiered seating across both ends of cross aisle; modern organ, choir seating, and communion table in aisle behind pulpit.

  5. 230. Halladale (Free Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1852; unaltered wood-lined interior partitioned at one end to serve as Sunday school; door to minister’s vestry in short wall opposite entrance with five-sided pulpit, complete with bracket for baptismal bowl and seat for minister, to one side; two blocks of open benches separated by central passageway with third block on other side of vestry door facing pulpit; front seats of all three blocks convert to form communion tables.

  6. 231. Laggan (Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1842–4 by James Ross; slightly altered interior with canopied pulpit in middle of short wall, complete with bracket for baptismal bowl, and semi-circular precentor’s desk wrapped around front of pulpit; open benches throughout; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered seating and supported on wooden columns which also support original plaster ceiling.

  7. 232. Rogart (St Callan, Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. Refitted 1817; substantially unaltered interior with canopied pulpit in middle of short wall and large square pews on either side; other seating provided by open benches raked towards short wall opposite pulpit; communion pew at pulpit end of one block of seating; no galleries.

  8. 233. Sleat (St Mary, Church of Scotland)

    Type 3. 1876–7; late unaltered example of traditional interior with pulpit, and precentor’s desk on short wall opposite pulpit with square pew containing original square communion table at pulpit end of central block; gallery across entrance wall containing family seats of Macdonalds of Sleat; original brass lamps attached to pulpit and communion pew.

(p.220) Moray

  1. 234. Spynie (Holy Trinity, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Early 19th-cent. fittings; retains canopied pulpit from rebuilding of church in 1735–6, lofts with painted fronts in all three projections, and mix of box pews, many incorporating tables, and open benches; minor alterations in 1949 when most woodwork stripped of paint and grained and platform installed for communion table, font, and lectern.

  2. 235. Tynet (St Ninian, Roman Catholic)

    Type 1. 1787; converted from house and byre, creating long and narrow interior, carefully restored in 1951; original canopied pulpit entered from sanctuary, wooden chancel arch, baptistery screen, confessional and benches, some incorporated in box pews; 18th-cent. golden dove suspended over modern free-standing altar in refitted sanctuary; tabernacle from original altar incorporated in W. wall of refitted baptistery.

Orkney

  1. 236. South Ronaldsay (St Peter, Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. Refitted 1801; canopied pulpit on one of long walls, with bracket for baptismal bowl but lacking precentor’s desk, and with large square pew in front formerly containing communion table; narrow communion tables with benches on each side between central pew and short end walls; other seating provided by mix of box pews and benches; lofts across short end walls.

Perth and Kinross

  1. 237. Portmoak (Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. 1832; pulpit in middle of one of long walls with domed tester and railed enclosure in front containing modern communion table, font, and lectern; box pews; five-sided gallery around three sides of interior with tiered box pews.

  2. 238. St Martins (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1843; canopied pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall; former table pews replaced with platform for modern communion table; box pews throughout, tiered in lofts of all three projections.

Scottish Borders

  1. 239. Channelkirk (St Cuthbert, Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. 1817; canopied pulpit with handsome staircase and velvet-lined seat for minister in middle of one of long walls; modern communion table, font, and lectern in front of pulpit; three blocks of box pews on ground floor and tiered box pews in gallery around three sides of interior; several collecting shoes on long poles.

  2. 240. Ettrick and Buccleuch (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1824; pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall with modern (p.221) communion table in front; seating provided by open benches; lofts in all three projections, one containing laird’s seat and reached by external staircase.

  3. 241. Fogo (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1817; pulpit with domed canopy in middle of long wall; box pews in all three projections, those in aisle opposite pulpit arranged in tiers; lofts containing family pews and reached by external staircases at each end of cross aisle; small organ, communion table, and large collecting boxes date from alterations of 1925.

  4. 242. Lauder (St Mary, Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1820–1; unusual cruciform variant of T-plan arrangement with box pews and lofts with tiered seating in all four projections; canopied pulpit, with bracket supporting pewter baptismal bowl, placed against one pier of crossing but visible from all parts of church; central space in front of pulpit has modern communion table, font, and lectern; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  5. 243. Newlands (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. 1838; canopied pulpit, approached by double staircase, and precentor’s desk in middle of long wall, with modern platform for communion table, font, and lectern in front; original seating in all three projections, but removed from two out of three lofts.

Shetland

  1. 244. Lunna (St Margaret, Church of Scotland)

    Type 2. Early-19th cent, fittings; substantially unaltered interior with canopied pulpit and precentor’s desk in middle of one of long walls, with modern communion table to one side; seating provided by open benches, tiered in gallery around three sides of interior; gallery is supported on Doric columns and has a balustraded front on long side opposite pulpit and panelled fronts on short sides.

West Lothian

  1. 245. Torphichen (Church of Scotland)

    Type 4. Refitted 1803; canopied pulpit in middle of long wall; seating in form of low benches with doors, those in aisle opposite pulpit converting for use as table pews; lofts in all three projections with tiered benches and family seats in loft opposite pulpit, which has small retiring room behind reached by external staircase; modern communion table in front of pulpit; church well restored in 1972 when woodwork painted pale grey and lofts decorated with armorials.

Section 4: Welsh Unitary Authorities

Anglesey

  1. 246. Llandyfrydog (St Tyfrydog)

    Type 6. Conservatively refitted in 1862 with minor alterations in 1898; seating (p.222) provided by mix of low box pews and benches (also fitted with doors) in nave and low box pews, three deep, facing inwards in chancel; pulpit on S. side of chancel arch with reading-desk on N. side and clerk’s desk incorporated in chancel seating.

  2. 247. Llanffinan (St Finan)

    Type 6. 1841; altar table railed on three sides with pulpit on S. and reading-desk on N. side, both fitted with original candle sconces; box pews and W. gallery.

  3. 248. Llanfigael (St Migael)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit, reading-desk, and clerk’s seat, lacking desk, in middle of N. wall of nave; box pews in chancel and E. part of nave; backless benches in W. part of nave; cupboard font with slate bowl on W. wall of nave.

  4. 249. Llangwyllog (St Cwyllog)

    Type 2. Refitted 1769; three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave with box pews in E. and open benches in W. parts of nave; altar table railed on three sides with seats for communicants along N. and S. sides of chancel; walls lined with hat-pegs; parish chest dated 1804.

Caerphilly

  1. 250. Hengoed (Welsh Baptist Chapel)

    Type 2/3. 1829; square interior with pulpit, approached by double staircase in middle of wall opposite entrance; large railed sêt fawr in front of pulpit with communion table from earlier chapel founded in 1710; three blocks of box pews facing pulpit; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered benches; walls lined with hat-pegs.

Cardiff

  1. 251. St Fagans (Capel Penrhiw, Unitarian)

    Type 2. 1777; chapel from Drefach Felindre (Carms.) dismantled and re-erected at Museum of Welsh Life in 1956; canopied pulpit in middle of long entrance wall with communion space in front across whole width of interior; box pews on ground floor with screened-off family pew adjacent to pulpit; gallery around three sides of interior has been reseated.

Carmarthenshire

  1. 252. Carmarthen (Capel Heol Awst, Independent)

    Type 2. 1826–7; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit, on tall thin column and approached by double staircase, on long wall opposite entrance; box pews on ground floor tiered against short walls; gallery around three sides of interior, with tiered seating, supported on iron columns painted to look like marble.

  2. 253. Castelldwyran (St Teilo)

    Type 6. Refitted 1876, see pp. 34–5.

  3. (p.223) 254. Glanaman (Yr Hen Bethel, Independent)

    Type 2. 1773; completely unaltered interior with pulpit placed in middle of long entrance wall, its staircase on one side and a family pew on the other; large sêt fawr in front of pulpit with original square communion table; six blocks of seating facing pulpit, with central passageway running from sêt fawr to fireplace in long wall opposite pulpit; gallery around three sides of interior with tiered benches; walls lined with two rows of hat-pegs; all woodwork painted deep yellow and interior still lit only by candles.

Ceredigion

  1. 255. Llangynfelyn (St Cynfelyn)

    Type 6. 1846; shallow chancel containing only altar table and rails; seating in nave provided by open benches with poppy-heads; tall pulpit approached by curved staircase on N. side of entrance to chancel with reading-desk on S. side.

Conwy

  1. 256. Betws-y-Coed (St Michael)

    Type 4. Refitted 1843; pulpit and reading-desk, made up from 17th–18th-cent. woodwork, on S. side of nave facing wide N. transept; benches in both nave and N. transept, tiered for children and singers at W. end of nave; 19th-cent. altar table and rails in chancel.

  2. 257. Capel Curig (St Cyriac and St Julitta)

    Type 4. 1839; L-plan interior with nave and S. transept of equal length; pulpit and reading-desk on S. side of altar; box pews in nave and loose benches in transept.

  3. 258. Gwydir Uchaf (Holy Trinity, CADW)

    Type 5. 1673 for Sir Richard Wynn; original painted ceiling; altar table railed on three sides and raised on marble pavement; stalls along N. and S. walls of interior with pulpit in middle and reading-desk at W. end of S. stall block; open space between stalls filled with domestic chairs facing E.; W. gallery for singers.

  4. 259. Llanddoged (St Doged)

    Type 2. 1838–9; see p. 81 and Plate 6b.

Denbighshire

  1. 260. Llanarmon Dyffryn Ceiriog (St Germain)

    Type 6. 1846; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit on one side of altar and reading- and clerk’s desks on other; box pews with font incorporated in baptism pew at W. end of nave.

  2. 261. Llangar (All Saints, CADW)

    Type 2. Early 18th-cent. fittings slightly altered after acquisition by Welsh Office in 1974; three-decker pulpit in middle of S. wall of nave; seating provided by mix of box pews and benches; walls lined with hat-pegs; altar table railed on three sides; W. gallery with seating for singers and musicians complete with music stand.

  3. (p.224) 262. Llangwyfan (St Cwyfan)

    Type 6. Refitted 1859; low box pews in nave with trefoil-headed bench ends and pews for singers at W. end; pulpit on N. and reading-desk on S. side of entrance to chancel; 18th-cent. baluster font, probably of foreign origin, with cherubs at each corner and representations of Adam and Eve, Noah’s Ark, Naaman bathing in Jordan, and baptism of Christ.

Gwynedd

  1. 263. Aberdaron (New Church)

    Type 6. 1841; built as replacement for former parish church but made chapel-of-ease when church restored for use in 1860; substantially unaltered interior with open benches at W. end of nave and box pews at E. end; low reading-desk on N. side of entrance to shallow chancel and taller pulpit on S. side; contemporary altar table, rail, and sanctuary chairs in chancel; wooden font at W. end of nave.

  2. 264. Carnguwch (St Beuno)

    Type 1. 1828; altar table railed on three sides, pulpit with brass stair rail, reading-desk and seat (but no desk) for parish clerk; seating provided by open benches.

  3. 265. Cefncymerau (Capel Salem, Baptist)

    Type 3. 1850, enlarged 1860; original pulpit, with two lamp brackets, and communion pew on one of short walls, with box pews, incorporating poles for lamps, tiered towards opposite short wall; no gallery; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  4. 266. Llandwrog (St Twrog)

    Type 5. 1860 by Henry Kennedy for Lord Newborough, see p. 111 and Plate 12a.

  5. 267. Llandygwnning (St Iestyn)

    Type 1. 1840 by John Welch; unaltered interior with green-grained pulpit, reading-desk, box pews, and ‘Gothick’ altar rails.

  6. 268. Llanfaglan (St Baglan, FFC)

    Type 4. Late 18th-cent. fittings, see p. 96.

  7. 269. Llanfrothen (St Brothen)

    Type 1. Refitted 1844; open benches in nave and stalls for children in chancel, some with railed backs; contemporary font cover, lectern, poor box, and seat near S. door for either parish clerk or schoolmaster; reused 17th-cent. pulpit, reading-desk, and sanctuary chairs, with reredos formed out of 17th-cent. bedhead.

  8. 270. Nanhoron (Capel Newydd, Independent)

    Type 2. 1769; unaltered interior with pulpit, precentor’s desk, and table pew in middle of long entrance wall; box pews placed directly on to earth floor and tiered against one of short walls; no galleries; walls lined with hat-pegs.

  9. (p.225) 271. Penllech (St Mary)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; unaltered interior with pulpit, reading-desk, box pews in E. part of nave, and benches in W. part.

  10. 272. Rhiw (St Aelrhiw)

    Type 4. 1860–1; see p. 101 and Plate 10a.

  11. 273. Ynyscynhaearn (St Cynhaearn)

    Type 4. 1830–2; see pp. 102–3 and Plate 10b.

Monmouthshire

  1. 274. Llangyfiw (St David)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; pulpit and reading-desk in middle of S. wall of nave; box pews in nave and on N. side of chancel with remains of pre-Reformation rood screen incorporated in seating; sanctuary raised two steps above level of chancel and railed off, with stone seat for communicants along E. wall behind altar table.

Newport

  1. 275. Nash (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1792; three-decker pulpit, box pews and W. gallery in nave; chancel rebuilt and refurnished 1861.

Pembrokeshire

  1. 276. Bayvil (St Andrew, FFC)

    Type 1. Early 19th-cent. fittings; canopied pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews.

  2. 277. Manordeifi (St David, Old Church)

    Type 6. Refitted c.1840; altar table railed on three sides; pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of chancel arch; box pews include family ones with fireplaces.

  3. 278. Nash (St Mary)

    Type 1. Refitted 1842; pulpit, reading-desk, and box pews in nave; W. gallery with balustraded front, benches, and hat-pegs; chancel refurnished 1987.

  4. 279. Redberth (St Mary)

    Type 1. 1841; ‘Gothick’ three-decker pulpit and box pews in nave, separated by wide central passageway originally filled with loose benches; chancel has been refurnished.

Powys

  1. 280. Disserth (St Cewydd)

    Type 2. 17th-18th-cent. fittings; three-decker pulpit in middle of S. wall of nave; pews for communicants on N. and S. sides of altar; box pews arranged haphazardly, many dated and inscribed with names or initials of those who erected them.

  2. (p.226) 281. Llandrindod Wells (Caebach Chapel, Independent)

    Type 3. 1715; unaltered interior with pulpit in middle of one of short walls with seats for communicants on both sides; box pews; gallery across short wall opposite pulpit with tiered seating.

  3. 282. Llanfihangel Helygen (St Michael)

    Type 2. Refitted 1812; pulpit and reading-desk in middle of N. wall of nave; seating provided by mix of box pews and open benches.

  4. 283. Llanfihangel Nant Melan (St Michael)

    Type 6. 1846 by Thomas Nicholson; unaltered interior with altar table in apsidal sanctuary and neo-Norman pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of entrance to chancel; seating provided by open benches.

  5. 284. Llanfyllin (St Myllin)

    Type 1. Refitted 1863–4; exceptionally conservative arrangement retaining W. gallery of 1729 and altar table of 1744; three blocks of box pews in nave with neo-Norman pulpit and reading-desk at E. end of S. pew block; chancel unstalled and separated from nave by neo-Norman arcade with neo-Norman altar rails closing off sanctuary area.

  6. 285. Maesyronnen (Independent Chapel)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; slightly altered interior retains lowered pulpit on long wall opposite entrance, box pews, benches, and two long communion tables; no galleries.

  7. 286. Pentrebach (Capel Beili-du, Calvinistic Methodist)

    Type 2. Refitted 1858; pulpit and sêt fawr in middle of long entrance wall; box pews tiered against opposite long wall; no galleries; adjacent Sunday schoolroom retains original benches and fireplace.

  8. 287. Pont Llogel (St Mary)

    Type 1. 1854 by Benjamin Ferrey; pre-ecclesiological arrangement with pulpit and reading-desk on S. side of sanctuary and organ on N. side; seating provided by open benches; original stained glass in E. lancets.

Vale of Glamorgan

  1. 288. Llantwit Major (Bethesda’r Fro Chapel, Independent)

    Type 2. 1806–7; substantially unaltered interior with pulpit and sêt fawr in middle of one of long walls; box pews placed on opposite sides of central passageway running from entrance on one short wall to fireplace on other; communion table placed in middle of passageway; no galleries.

  2. 289. Michaelston-le-Pit (St Michael)

    Type 2. Early 19th-cent. fittings; unusual arrangement with pulpit, reading-desk, large family pew and benches facing E. in nave, and benches facing W. in W. part of chancel; E. part of chancel has been refurnished.

(p.227) Wrexham

  1. 290. Worthenbury (St Deiniol)

    Type 1. 1736–9; substantially unaltered interior with four blocks of box pews and three-decker pulpit in nave and family pews with fireplaces in chancel; apsidal sanctuary has elaborate plaster ceiling with dove in a glory over altar table and mix of original heraldic and imported medieval glass in E. window; W. gallery added 1830.

Section 5: Anglican Churches and Chapels in the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, and Republic of Ireland

Isle of Man

  1. 291. Kirk Braddan (St Brendan, Old Church)

    Type 1. 1773; completely unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit, altar table and rails, box pews, and hat-pegs.

Northern Ireland

  1. 292. Ballinderry (Middle Church)

    Type 2. 1664–8; substantially unaltered interior renovated in 1896; three-decker pulpit in middle of N. wall of nave; box pews and stone baluster font; 18th-cent. W. gallery approached by external staircase.

  2. 293. Hillsborough (St Malachy)

    Type 6. 1772–4; substantially unaltered interior renovated in 1898 and 1951–65; tall canopied pulpit and lower reading-desk on opposite sides of entrance to refurnished chancel; narrow box pews in nave and at ends of transepts; central space under crossing occupied by four large square pews, one for sovereign and burgesses of town, one for bishop of diocese, and two for Marquess of Downshire and his family; marble baluster font; W. gallery with original organ.

  3. 294. Leckpatrick (St Patrick)

    Type 4. 1816, enlarged 1834; unaltered interior with pulpit and reading-desk in middle of S. wall of nave facing N. transept; complete set of box pews, painted dove grey and curved at E. end of nave in front of semi-circular railed sanctuary; pew at E. end of nave on S. side contains stone baluster font.

Republic of Ireland

  1. 295. Ballymakenny (St Nicholas)

    Type 1. 1785–93 to design by Thomas Cooley and Francis Johnson; unaltered interior with three-decker pulpit, box pews, seats for communicants, altar table railed on three sides, and ‘Gothick’ reredos incorporating panels for Ten Commandments, Creed, and Lord’s Prayer.

  2. 296. Clongish (St Paul)

    Type 3. 1829; unaltered cruciform interior with galleries across W. end of nave and both transepts; original organ and seats for singers in W. gallery; box pews in (p.228) nave and transepts; altar table placed in front of tall cylindrical carved pulpit balanced on opposite sides by reading-and clerk’s desks.

  3. 297. Dromard (Christ Church)

    Type 4. c.1820; unaltered interior with vestry under W. tower and transepts at W. end of nave; pulpit and reading-desk against W. wall of nave with altar table, railed on three sides, at E. end; box pews facing pulpit and reading-desk in nave and transepts, their backs to altar.

  4. 298. Dublin (Rotunda Hospital Chapel)

    Type 6. 1757–62; slightly altered interior with box pews reduced in height and gallery around three sides, supported on wooden columns and with organ over entrance; altar table railed on three sides with pulpit and reading-desk on opposite sides of sanctuary; original baroque plasterwork on walls and ceilings, with elaborate reredos incorporating Venetian E. window, designed by Austrian sculptor, Bartholomew Cramillion.

  5. 299. Glenealy (St Gregory)

    Type 5. 1791–2; slightly altered interior with pulpit on S. and reading-desk on N. side of shallow sanctuary; canopied stalls against N., S., and W. walls of nave with second row of stalls in front of them on N. and S. sides and gallery across W. end of nave; late 19th-cent. additions include tiled floors, eagle lectern, and stone octagonal font.

  6. 300. Timogue (St Mochua)

    Type 3. 1736, though fittings probably early 19th cent., renovated in 1964; see p. 85 and Plate 7a.

The denominational breakdown of buildings in the above list is as follows:

Anglican:

Church of England

182

Church in Wales

35

Church of Ireland

9

226

Non-Anglican:

Church of Scotland

32

Independent/Congregational

10

Unitarian

9

Baptist

8

Roman Catholic

8

Free Church of Scotland

2

Calvinist/Huntingtonian

2

Lutheran

1

Calvinistic Methodist

1

Wesleyan Methodist

1

74

The revision of the entries for Anglican buildings in Appendix B has produced a slightly different balance of liturgical types from those shown in Table 2 (p. 67 (p.229) above) as shown in Table 5. It is clear that the larger sample of surviving buildings in this new appendix has shown that the majority of additional buildings included are of the type particularly identified with the period of pre-Tractarian liturgical experimentation which took place in the late 18th and early 19th cents.

Table 5. Liturgical Arrangement of Anglican churches in Appendix B compared with those in Table 2

Appendix B (%)

Table 2 (%)

Traditional arrangement (Type 1)

43.8

45.5

N–S rectangle (Type 2)

13.3

Appendix B Guide to Surviving Pre-Ecclesiological Liturgical Arrangements in Britain

E–W rectangle (Type 3)

4.0

T-Plan (Type 4)

6.6

Collegiate arrangement (Type 5)

14.6

Appendix B Guide to Surviving Pre-Ecclesiological Liturgical Arrangements in Britain

Pre-Tractarian experiment (Type 6)

17.7

Size of sample: surviving buildings, Table 2, 189; Table 5, 226.