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Verbal Syntax in the Greek PentateuchNatural Greek Usage and Hebrew Interference$
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T. V. Evans

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198270102

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270102.001.0001

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Data and Interpretation

Data and Interpretation

Chapter:
(p.91) 5 Data and Interpretation
Source:
Verbal Syntax in the Greek Pentateuch
Author(s):

T. V. Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270102.003.0005

This chapter supplies a statistical analysis of the MT formal matches for all 18,953 instances of verbal forms in the Greek Pentateuch. Interpretation of the data follows, focusing on the key features of independent Greek usage and Hebrew influence. The results are in general consistent with the findings of other scholars for small portions of the same material or for other parts of the LXX. But an advantage of this analysis is that it provides precise coverage of the evidence from a very large sample of text and embraces the entire verbal system. Because of this broad scope, this study demonstrates the formal matches with the MT more comprehensively than any previous analysis of the verbal system in translation Greek. It can be seen that some noteworthy patterns of usage emerge from so large a body of evidence.

Keywords:   imperfect indicatives, Greek Penteteuch, Masoretic Text, Hebrew influence, bilingual interference

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