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Radical ChurchmanEdward Lee Hicks and the New Liberalism$
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Graham Neville

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198269779

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269779.001.0001

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Churchmen and the New Liberalism

Churchmen and the New Liberalism

Chapter:
(p.316) 15 Churchmen and the New Liberalism
Source:
Radical Churchman
Author(s):

Graham Neville

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269779.003.0015

This chapter describes that the life and ministry of Edward Lee Hicks was in an obvious sense unique; yet it may also be taken as a representative example of churchmanship at a particular moment in the development of English society. It observes that this was the time of the New Liberalism, and Hicks was fortunate in living in the very home of the Manchester Guardian which became one of its best advocates. It points out that students of political thought often describe the emergent ideology of the period without any regard for the participation of churchmen. It stresses further that it is useful to identify the participation of churchmen such as Hicks in supporting it, not in order to add significantly to the description of New Liberalism, but to indicate that the development of Christian social thought is as closely linked to that political development as to the emergence of socialism.

Keywords:   ministry, Edward Lee Hicks, churchmanship, English society, New Liberalism, Manchester Guardian, churchmen, Christian social thought, socialism

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