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Christology and CosmologyModels of Divine Activity in Origen, Eusebius, and Athanasius$
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J. Rebecca Lyman

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198267454

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198267454.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.160) Conclusion
Source:
Christology and Cosmology
Author(s):

J. REBECCA LYMAN

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198267454.003.0006

Logos Christology was not a passive product of cosmological categories, but a creative, passionate model of an emerging world-view. In their apologetic and polemical presentations of Christology, Origen, Eusebius, and Athanasius each borrowed and modified common formulas of Late Antiquity to express particular theological concerns. These concerns were not only individual beliefs, however; they also represented the spiritual and social realities of the communities which shaped the focus and language of each man: small urban study groups, public civic apologetics, and the emerging ascetical church. Defining the subordination of the Son as an essentially soteriological error unfortunately forced early reflection into later Trinitarian or Christological models. In conclusion, some ‘correlations’ which appear to exist between the cosmological models and historical communities of the three authors are outlined.

Keywords:   Christology, Logos, cosmological models, Origen, Eusebius, Athanasius

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