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Hell and the VictoriansA Study of the Nineteenth-Century Theological Controversies concerning Eternal Punishment and the Future Life$
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Geoffrey Rowell

Print publication date: 1974

Print ISBN-13: 9780198266389

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198266389.001.0001

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Eternal Hope

Eternal Hope

Chapter:
(p.139) VII Eternal Hope
Source:
Hell and the Victorians
Author(s):

Geoffrey Rowell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198266389.003.0007

In many respects, the debate between Farrar and Pusey only echoed the established arguments of earlier controversies: the appeal to a fixed, revealed doctrine on the one hand, and the protest against its morally intolerable nature on the other; a fear of giving a licence to sin on the one hand, and a fear of making it impossible for men to believe in a good God on the other; the pitting of text against text, and authority against authority. By 1880, the debate had quite clearly moved from whether eternal punishment was, or was not, the teaching of Scripture, to whether it could be shown to be morally defensible and consistent with contemporary ideas of progress and humanitarianism.

Keywords:   eternal hope, Farrar, Pusey, progress, humanitarianism, eternal punishment

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