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Hegel's Development: Night Thoughts (Jena 1801–1806)$
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H. S. Harris

Print publication date: 1983

Print ISBN-13: 9780198246541

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198246541.001.0001

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‘Through Philosophy to Learn to Live’

‘Through Philosophy to Learn to Live’

Chapter:
(p.191) Chapter V ‘Through Philosophy to Learn to Live’
Source:
Hegel's Development: Night Thoughts (Jena 1801–1806)
Author(s):

H. S. Harris

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198246541.003.0006

In the spring of 1803, Schelling left Jena. That summer Hegel delivered the course for which the systematic manuscript of which the surviving System of Ethical Life formed the third part, was prepared. It was a meditation on the ‘need of philosophy’. In that essay, Hegel argued that a culture that has developed tensions and conflicts that are not properly comprehended becomes a system of ‘relative’ necessity, in which spiritual freedom is reduced to a hopeless striving or is driven in upon itself so that it takes refuge in a dream world. The discussion examines his ‘Outline of Universal Philosophy’, his concepts of ‘consciousness’ and ‘spirit’, Absolute Spirit in the ‘Outline’, and philosophy as absolute cognition.

Keywords:   universal philosophy, consciousness, spirit, absolute cognition, speculative philosophy

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