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Aristotle's ManSpeculations upon Aristotelian Anthropology$
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Stephen R.L. Clark

Print publication date: 1975

Print ISBN-13: 9780198245162

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198245162.001.0001

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The Doctrine of the Mean

The Doctrine of the Mean

Chapter:
(p.84) III.2. The Doctrine of the Mean
Source:
Aristotle's Man
Author(s):

Stephen R.L. Clark

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198245162.003.0006

This chapter suggests that the analogy between moral sense and the primary sense is of considerable value. Moral awareness involves the concept of a mean: the form of virtue is elicited from a discussion of the virtues, commonly so called, in the light of biological and metaphysical theses about wholes. Virtue is revealed as a form of balance: the most reliable judge in moral as in other matters is he who is least one-sided, who sums up the various human potentials and so sees straight. The three means of social life, aletheia, eutrapelia, and philia, are described. The judge must balance the contestants' claims against each other, giving each their proper weight, and any deviation is equally injustice.

Keywords:   moral sense, primary sense, moral awareness, mean, virtue, wholes, aletheia, eutrapelia, philia

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