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The Gestapo and German SocietyEnforcing Racial Policy 1933-1945$
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Robert Gellately

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780198228691

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198228691.001.0001

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Compliance through Pressure

Compliance through Pressure

Chapter:
(p.185) 7 Compliance through Pressure
Source:
The Gestapo and German Society
Author(s):

Robert Gellately

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198228691.003.0008

This chapter discusses the many ways with which the Gestapo doubled its effort to obtain compliance. In order to enforce compliance, the Gestapo interpreted its mandate in the broadest possible terms, and went about fulfilling it by applying pressure when necessary, at times by the use of extremely brutal methods. Those who oppose the Gestapo's anti-Semitism stance were either summoned to the police headquarters or sent off to a concentration camp. In this chapter the different methods of the Gestapo such as intimidation, extortion, and blackmail as well as deportation and ‘purifying’ and other degeneracy methods are discussed. The collaboration and public participation through public denunciation and volunteered information are discussed as well.

Keywords:   compliance, brutal methods, intimidation, extortion, deportation, purifying methods, degeneracy methods, public participation, public denunciation, volunteered information

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