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Calvinism on the Frontier 1600–1660International Calvinism and the Reformed Church in Hungary and Transylvania$
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Graeme Murdock

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208594

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208594.001.0001

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Constitutional Toleration and Confessional Rivalry

Constitutional Toleration and Confessional Rivalry

Chapter:
(p.110) 4 Constitutional Toleration and Confessional Rivalry
Source:
Calvinism on the Frontier 1600–1660
Author(s):

Graeme Murdock

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208594.003.0004

This chapter examines relations between the Reformed church and its rivals within the context of Calvinist dominance of Transylvania and growing Catholic power in Royal Hungary. Reformed relations with the other churches are discussed, first with the Catholic Church, which was perceived not only as a domestic opponent, but also as a demonic international enemy. Closer connections with western Protestants brought a noticeable hardening of Reformed attitudes towards the Unitarian Church, increasingly seen by Hungarian Calvinists as something of an international embarrassment. Meanwhile, a more complicated relationship developed with local Lutherans, with some irenic appeals made to Lutherans for Protestant unity alongside continuing inter-confessional rivalry and doctrinal disputes. While contact with foreign Calvinists mostly contributed to the hardening of confessional boundaries in Hungary and Transylvania, it also encouraged some Reformed ministers to consider the possibility of a pan-Protestant, anti-papal front. A clear limit on the extent of practical toleration of a multiplicity of confessions was established in 1572.

Keywords:   Hungary, Transylvania, Reformed church, Catholic Church, Protestants, Unitarian Church, Calvinists, Lutherans, inter-confessional rivalry, confessions

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