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The I.R.A. and its EnemiesViolence and Community in Cork, 1916-1923$
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Peter Hart

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198208068

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208068.001.0001

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The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Family

The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Family

Chapter:
(p.187) 9 The Rise and Fall of a Revolutionary Family
Source:
The I.R.A. and its Enemies
Author(s):

Peter Hart

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198208068.003.0009

This chapter explores the lives of two brothers, Sean Hales and Tom Hales. The Hales family had been in the eye of the revolutionary storm in West Cork since the 1916 uprising, and their personal histories were closely intertwined with that of the Volunteer movement. Both brothers were committed to the revolution. The achievement of this goal rested on their underground activities with the Irish Republican Brotherhood (I.R.B.) and the revived Volunteers. In Frongoch they met rebels from all over Ireland and Britain. Sean became friends with Michael Collins and his I.R.B. clique, many of whom were also natives of West Cork. On August 22 1922, Michael Collins was killed in an ambush commandeered by Tom Hales. The war and the revolution ended for the Hales family in December 1922. Sean was assassinated in Dublin in retaliation for an emergency powers bill he had not voted for, while Tom was captured.

Keywords:   Sean Hales, Tom Hales, West Cork, Michael Collins, Irish Republican Brotherhood, revolution

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