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Botswana 1939–1945An African Country at War$
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Ashley Jackson

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207641

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207641.001.0001

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Wartime Food Production: Grain Storage, the Warlands, and the Persistence of Agricultural Individualism

Wartime Food Production: Grain Storage, the Warlands, and the Persistence of Agricultural Individualism

Chapter:
(p.159) 8 Wartime Food Production: Grain Storage, the Warlands, and the Persistence of Agricultural Individualism
Source:
Botswana 1939–1945
Author(s):

Ashley Jackson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207641.003.0008

An agricultural scheme that was commonly referred to as the warlands – cleared and cultivated blocks of land for producing tribal grain reserves – was utilized by the British Administration in efforts to increase the production of food. However, this measure is often viewed as one that was intended for the benefit of ‘the colonial state and its feudal compradors’ to acquire the surplus produce from peasants. This attempt was also depicted as a means of maintaining the agricultural production level in spite of a significant decline in the labour supply due to both recruitment for the British Army and work in the South African mines. Aside from presenting the intended function and underlying motives of this scheme, this chapter explains how these relate to agricultural policy, and how this scheme was not able to achieve most of its goals.

Keywords:   agricultural scheme, warlands, grain reserves, British Administration, surplus produce, motives, function, agricultural production, agricultural policy

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