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France: The Dark Years,
                        1940–1944$
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Julian Jackson

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198207061

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207061.001.0001

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Resistance in Society

Resistance in Society

Chapter:
(p.475) 20 Resistance in Society
Source:
France: The Dark Years, 1940–1944
Author(s):

Julian Jackson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198207061.003.0021

This chapter examines the relationship between the Resistance and the mass of the French population. Through the creation of such organizations as the Armée secrète (AS), the Conseil national de la Résistance (CNR), the Mouvements unis de la Résistance (MUR), and the Mouvement de Libération nationale (MLN), the Resistance was moving towards greater integration and unification: controlling this process was what lay behind the power struggles. Consolidation was accompanied by centralization. From the spring of 1943, even the main resistance organizations in the South — the Bureau d’information et de presse (BIP), the Comité général d’études (CGE), and the MUR — moved their headquarters to Paris. Lyons had become too dangerous and too small. The former ‘capital of the Resistance’ was now also the regional capital of the Gestapo. The move to Paris also signalled that the Resistance was looking to the day when it would be called upon to govern.

Keywords:   France, Resistance movement, French population, civil society, French masses

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