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Francesco Crispi 1818-1901From Nation to Nationalism$
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Christopher Duggan

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198206118

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206118.001.0001

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The New Deputy

The New Deputy

Chapter:
(p.219) 8 The New Deputy
Source:
Francesco Crispi 1818-1901
Author(s):

CHRISTOPHER DUGGAN

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198206118.003.0009

Francesco Crispi resigned from Giuseppe Garibaldi's government, but the magnanimity that he was determined to show in defeat was not displayed by the moderates in victory. The hostility of the moderates towards those who had fought to free Naples and Sicily from the Bourbons gathered momentum after Garibaldi had left for Caprera. Crispi agreed to stand for parliament in the third college in Palermo, but he was defeated in the first ballot by the moderate candidate, the Marquis di Torrearsa. He was then elected to the college of Castelvetrano. Crispi entered parliament with a set of ideas forged over a period of more than twenty years in politics. The idea of ‘the nation’ was a crucial element in Crispi's political thought. After the capture of Rome in 1870, Crispi's idea of an ongoing national revolution in Italy began to assume a more problematic character.

Keywords:   Francesco Crispi, Italy, Giuseppe Garibaldi, parliament, politics, moderates, nation, election

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