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Dons and WorkersOxford and Adult Education since 1850$
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Lawrence Goldman

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205753

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205753.001.0001

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Extending Oxford: University Extension in the Late-Victorian and Edwardian Age

Extending Oxford: University Extension in the Late-Victorian and Edwardian Age

Chapter:
(p.61) 3 Extending Oxford: University Extension in the Late-Victorian and Edwardian Age
Source:
Dons and Workers
Author(s):

Lawrence Goldman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205753.003.0004

Acland was elected to Parliament in 1885 and his translation to politics provided the opportunity to refound university extension in Oxford. Michael Sadler was appointed secretary at the end of April 1885, and new regulations for extension lectures were drafted and approved. Under Sadler a more formal administration of the programme developed, and Oxford came to follow the pattern laid down by Cambridge. Oxford extension was similarly dependent on the voluntary efforts of local enthusiasts who organized, planned, and publicized courses. By the 1890s the elements of an extension education had been established. Oxford extension offered Sadler, like Acland before him, the opportunity of building a career in public service and using experience and knowledge gained through lecturing in the wider cause of social reform.

Keywords:   education, universities, colleges, curricula, social reform, lectures, lecturing

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