Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume II: The Eighteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

P. J. Marshall and Alaine Low

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205630

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205630.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 October 2018

The British West Indies in the Age of Abolition, 1748–1815

The British West Indies in the Age of Abolition, 1748–1815

Chapter:
(p.415) 19 The British West Indies in the Age of Abolition, 1748–1815
Source:
The Oxford History of the British Empire: Volume II: The Eighteenth Century
Author(s):

J. R. Ward

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205630.003.0019

The years from 1748 to 1815 constitute a new phase of British expansion in the Caribbean, when the region was a main focus of national strategic effort. During this period, the West Indies achieved their greatest economic importance within the British Empire. After holding steady at about 10% during the first half of the 18th century, their share of British exports and imports rose to about 20% by 1815. Subsequently, the British West Indies’ relative importance would decline sharply. The colonies’ economic standing was determined above all by their performance as sugar producers. The West Indies’ share of British trade increased during the 1748–1815 period partly through their established function as sugar producers. The free coloureds became a conspicuous intermediate element in British West Indian society, but without performing an effective integrating role. They were almost as colour-conscious as the whites. Mixed race people insisted that a degree of European ancestry gave them superiority over the black masses.

Keywords:   British West Indies, British Empire, British expansion, British exports, British imports, British West Indian society, abolition

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .