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Translating the EnlightenmentScottish Civic Discourse in Eighteenth-Century Germany$
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Fania Oz-Salzberger

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198205197

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205197.001.0001

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The Hazards of Translation: Some Models of Misreception

The Hazards of Translation: Some Models of Misreception

Chapter:
(p.77) 3 The Hazards of Translation: Some Models of Misreception
Source:
Translating the Enlightenment
Author(s):

Fania Oz-salzberger

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198205197.003.0004

This chapter examines problems in the translation of Scottish books into German during the Enlightenment which led to the misreception of some Scottish works. It suggests that the misreception of Scottish thoughts in Germany may be attributed to either mistranslation or misreading. It offers a different reading of Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi and a different model of misreception. It suggests that German readers of Scottish texts were neither fully conditioned nor radically affected, and that the process took place within a complex network of linguistic shifts reflecting different habits of thinking about political issues.

Keywords:   mistranslation, Germany, Scottish books, Enlightenment, Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi, linguistic shift

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