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Broken Lives$
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Lawrence Stone

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198202547

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202547.001.0001

Loveden v. Loveden The lady and the don, 1794–1811

Chapter:
(p.248) 9 Loveden v. Loveden The lady and the don, 1794–1811
Source:
Broken Lives
Author(s):

Lawrence Stone

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198202547.003.0010

From a legal point of view, the importance of the case in this chapter is that it set a series of precedents in canon law of sufficient importance to be publicly reported for future citation. These precedents were set by the sentence of Sir William Scott, in which he redefined the degree of proof necessary in an ecclesiastical court to obtain a verdict of separation for adultery. The passage through Parliament of the Loveden divorce bill also settled once and for all that the husband had to comply with the wishes of the Commons over the settlement of adequate maintenance upon his wife before such a bill could be returned to the Lords. Thus in several ways the Loveden divorce litigation made legal history.

Keywords:   adultery, separation, canon law, legal precedents, divorce litigation, maintenance

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