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YorkThe Making of a City 1068-1350$
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Sarah Rees Jones

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780198201946

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201946.001.0001

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Landscapes of Lordship at the time of the Conquest: The Minster, the King, and the Earl

Landscapes of Lordship at the time of the Conquest: The Minster, the King, and the Earl

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Landscapes of Lordship at the time of the Conquest: The Minster, the King, and the Earl
Source:
York
Author(s):

Sarah Rees Jones

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201946.003.0002

This chapter reconstructs the fees of the king, the archbishop, and the earl of Northumbria, between which the city of York was divided in 1066. It uses the evidence of Domesday Book, of charters recording the payment of husgabel rents, and some early surveys of the estates of York Minster. The chapter assesses how these fees were mapped onto the urban landscape area, with the areas that were more urbanized being assigned to the king’s fee, and speculates on the reasons for and chronology of this division. The chapter also assesses the presence of the earls of Northumbria in the city, noticing aspects of their investment in the urban landscape that have previously been neglected. Comparisons are drawn with a number of other county towns and London.

Keywords:   Domesday, burgages, urban lords, pre-Conquest government, cathedral cities, county cities

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