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Proportional RepresentationCritics of the British Electoral System 1820-1945$
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Jenifer Hart

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780198201366

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201366.001.0001

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School Boards, Local Government, and Home Rule, 1885–1904

School Boards, Local Government, and Home Rule, 1885–1904

Chapter:
(p.126) VI School Boards, Local Government, and Home Rule, 1885–1904
Source:
Proportional Representation
Author(s):

Jenifer Hart

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198201366.003.0007

The electoral reform movement took on a low profile for the twenty years after proportional representation had not been adopted in 1885. Although the PRS may have become less active, Lubbock and Courtney — the organization's foremost leaders — did not stop promoting their cause and they took every opportunity they could to keep working. This chapter illustrates how both Lubbock and Courtney were able to incorporate their ideas specifically through three different areas: school boards, local government, and the home rule for Ireland. The chapter looks into how they attempted to set up a select committee for the election of those to be included in school boards, how democratically elected local authorities allowed questions regarding the electoral procedure, and how a bill was introduced that enabled elections by simple majority.

Keywords:   electoral reform, PRS, Lubbock, Courtney, school board, local government, home rule, Ireland, simple majority

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