Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Faerie Queene and Middle English Romance: The Matter of Just Memory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Andrew King

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198187226

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198187226.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2018

Displaced Youths and Slandered Ladies in Middle English Romance

Displaced Youths and Slandered Ladies in Middle English Romance

Chapter:
(p.78) 4 Displaced Youths and Slandered Ladies in Middle English Romance
Source:
The Faerie Queene and Middle English Romance: The Matter of Just Memory
Author(s):

Andrew King

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198187226.003.0004

This chapter explores the themes of displaced youths and slandered ladies in a number of Middle English verse romances designated as the ‘Eustace-Constance-Florence-Griselda Legends’: Sir Isumbras, The King of Tars, Sir Eglamour of Artois, Octavian, Le Bone Florence of Rome, Sir Triamour, and Sir Torent of Portyngale. In the romances of displaced youths, great value is attached to aristocratic birth as the prerogative of chivalric nobility is seen; even if the character's behaviour is boorish or incompetent because of his displaced upbringing, his birth ensures that he will eventually regain his correct position in society. In contrast, the female characters are judged not according to their birth but entirely by their deeds or alleged misdeeds. Although these women are usually of aristocratic birth, their social nobility is never seen by characters in the text as evidence that they are virtuous and chaste, or noble in a behavioural sense.

Keywords:   displaced youths, slandered ladies, Eustace-Constance-Florence-Griselda Legends, Sir Isumbras, The King of Tars, Sir Eglamour of Artois, Octavian, Le Bone Florence of Rome, Sir Triamour, Sir Torent of Portyngale

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .