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Figuring Sex between Men from Shakespeare to Rochester$
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Paul Hammond

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198186922

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186922.001.0001

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Shakespearian Figures

Shakespearian Figures

Chapter:
(p.62) 2 Shakespearian Figures
Source:
Figuring Sex between Men from Shakespeare to Rochester
Author(s):

Hammond Paul

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198186922.003.0003

This chapter considers ideas about how texts open and close possibilities, and uses them to read some of Shakespeare's work. It first focuses on the Sonnets, on the rhetoric of possession and dispossession through which the poet tries to represent his relationship with the ‘lovely boy’, often rather desperately redescribing betrayal as fidelity, and indifference as love. It then turns to Shakespeare's dialogue with the homoerotic poems of Richard Barnfield, tracing how Shakespeare adapts some of Barnfield's simplistic images and scenarios into his much more emotionally and rhetorically complex forms. The chapter explores how Shakespeare transformed the source materials for Twelfth Night and The Merchant of Venice in way which offered homoerotic scenarios which were not available in the originals.

Keywords:   Shakespeare, Sonnets, Richard Barnfield, Twelfth Night, The Merchant of Venice, homoeroticism, homosexual men

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