Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
DumbstruckA Cultural History of Ventriloquism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven Connor

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198184331

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184331.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 November 2017

At Home and Abroad: Monsieur Alexandre and Mr Mathews

At Home and Abroad: Monsieur Alexandre and Mr Mathews

Chapter:
(p.265) 12 At Home and Abroad: Monsieur Alexandre and Mr Mathews
Source:
Dumbstruck
Author(s):

Steven Connor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198184331.003.0012

Charles Mathews, a long-established comic actor, had first presented his one man show in London in 1818. The show was strung loosely together around a series of recitations, dialogues, sketches, and songs, all of them performed by Mathews himself. The governing structure of the evening’s entertainment was usually that of a journey, or in later years of a journey through Mathews’s own reminiscences. When Alexandre Vattemare began performing his Adventures of a Ventriloquist, Mathews had just opened with The Youthful Days of Mr Mathews, an entertainment organized around Mathews’s personal reminiscences of various comic types and incidents. Mathews supplemented his highly-developed powers of mimicry with ventriloquism, a skill which he had first acquired while working with a theatrical company in Swansea between 1795 and 1797. Ventriloquism featured most often in the ‘monopolylogue’ with which Mathews’s entertainments usually concluded after 1819.

Keywords:   Charles Mathews, journey, Alexandre Vattemare, entertainment, mimicry, ventriloquism, monopolylogue

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .