Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Scholars and GentlemenShakespearean Textual Criticism and Representations of Scholarly Labour, 1725-1765$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Simon Jarvis

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198182955

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198182955.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 June 2018

Conclusion: Textual Criticism and Enlightenment

Conclusion: Textual Criticism and Enlightenment

Chapter:
(p.182) Conclusion: Textual Criticism and Enlightenment
Source:
Scholars and Gentlemen
Author(s):

Simon Jarvis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198182955.003.0009

A central argument of this book has been that neither the rise of historicist approaches to the idea of linguistic correctness nor the advent of bibliographically grounded approaches to textual criticism can be understood if they are taken as the inventions of accidentally enlightened pioneers, on the one hand, or as the symptoms of the descent of an ‘Enlightenment’ epistemological world-view or schema, on the other. Instead, both of these shifts in philological practice are inseparably bound up with the changing representations of literary labour in general, and of the labour of minute criticism in particular. In addition, the first editor to print a text of William Shakespeare abandoning the textus receptus as the source of copy-text was Edward Capell. If one is to locate the sudden break between pre-enlightened and enlightened practices of textual criticism it should surely be with Capell's work.

Keywords:   textual criticism, Enlightenment, philological practice, literary labour, minute criticism, William Shakespeare, textus receptus, Edward Capell, linguistic correctness

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .