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Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia$
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Pat Rogers

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198182597

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198182597.001.0001

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Johnson, Boswell, and Anti–Scottish Sentiment

Johnson, Boswell, and Anti–Scottish Sentiment

Chapter:
(p.191) (p.192) 8Johnson, Boswell, and Anti–Scottish Sentiment
Source:
Johnson and Boswell: The Transit of Caledonia
Author(s):

Pat Rogers

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198182597.003.0008

This chapter discusses the issue hovering behind the Journey — that is, the moral panic which grew up in England in the third quarter of the eighteenth century on the subject of Scottish influence. This phase of anti-Scottish feeling is a familiar datum in histories of the period, since it finds expression in diverse fields such as politics, literature, painting, and architecture. But there is no connected treatment of the issue in its most specific aspects when one considers that figures such as David Hume, John Wilkes, the Earl of Bute, Tobias Smollett, and others of comparable stature are involved in the story. More pertinently, there is a direct link here with the content and reception of Johnson's own Journey, and again with Boswell's own anxieties.

Keywords:   Journey, England, anti-Scottish feeling, David Hume, John Wilkes, Earl of Bute, Tobias Smollett, Johnson, Boswell

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