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Latin American TelevisionA Global View$
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John Sinclair

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198159308

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159308.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction
Source:
Latin American Television
Author(s):

John Sinclair

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198159308.003.0001

In order to understand how the globalisation of television production and distribution has developed, it is necessary to take language and culture into account as primary ‘market forces’ which enable the major producers and distributors of television programmes and services to gain access to markets outside their nations of origin. In this context, it becomes helpful to discard the metaphor of the ‘worlds’ which share a common language in favour of the concept of ‘geolinguistic regions’. In the geolinguistic regions of Spanish and Portuguese, particular media corporations have arisen which have been able to exploit the massive size of the domestic markets. The crucial fact is that the most popular programmes, indeed entire television genres such as the Latin American soap opera or telenovela in particular, are in the language and cultural ambit of the countries which so avidly consume them as imports.

Keywords:   globalisation, television, language, culture, market forces, geolinguistic region, Spanish, Portuguese, media corporations, telenovela

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