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The Origins of Modern Literary Yiddish$
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Dov-Ber Kerler

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198151661

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151661.001.0001

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The Eighteenth-Century Origins of Modern Literary Yiddish

The Eighteenth-Century Origins of Modern Literary Yiddish

Chapter:
36 The Eighteenth-Century Origins of Modern Literary Yiddish
Source:
The Origins of Modern Literary Yiddish
Author(s):

Dov-Ber Kerler

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198151661.003.0036

The late eighteenth century saw Eastern literature as a constantly moving, rapidly changing and evolving form, making their way into modernization. It is a journey that finally ended with the debut of modern Eastern literature. There were two types of literature that stand witness to this change. There were those that were revised from old Yiddish literature to give rise to a modern feel and structure, and those that we purely and entirely written in modern contemporary Eastern literature. Although linguistic change were more confined and to some degree restrained in revisions of old Yiddish texts, morphology was mostly and significantly altered in these texts. The need for change cannot be ignored as it is demanded by the new century.

Keywords:   change, modernization, linguistic change

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