Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Romanticism and the Self-Conscious Poem$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael O'Neill

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198122852

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122852.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 March 2019

Writing and History in Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion: Keats (2)

Writing and History in Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion: Keats (2)

Chapter:
(p.210) 8 Writing and History in Hyperion and The Fall of Hyperion: Keats (2)
Source:
Romanticism and the Self-Conscious Poem
Author(s):

Michael O'Neill

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122852.003.0008

This chapter focuses on questions about the validity of certain historicist readings of Keats that depend on notions of art as displacement, but argues that the Hyperion project does register and give shape to historical pressures, and that a principal means of such registering is the poetry's preoccupation with writing and the status of poetry. It suggests, in relation to the Induction to The Fall of Hyperion, that post-Romantic reflexiveness is ushered in by these lines, even as they can be viewed as speaking out of that ‘felt helplessness’ which Raymond Williams sees as afflicting Romantic poets.

Keywords:   Keats, art, displacement, The Fall of Hyperion, Romantic poets

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .