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Hardy's Literary Language and Victorian Philology$

Dennis Taylor

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198122616

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198122616.001.0001

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(p.385) Appendix 2 Hardy's Notable Dialect Words in Wright and the OED

(p.385) Appendix 2 Hardy's Notable Dialect Words in Wright and the OED

Source:
Hardy's Literary Language and Victorian Philology
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The dialect words for which Hardy is listed as the unique entry in Wright and, as noted, in the OED, are: a-croupied (‘crouched [down]’), a-gaying, anighst (as adv., but listed by Barnes in his ‘List’), bachelor man, batty-cake (small cake, listed by Hardy in his copy of Barnes's 1863 Glossary), blinking (‘shining intermittently’), turn the blood (‘cure [by magical application]’), bodement, burn off (show a light to warn smugglers), by side and by seam (‘everywhere’), chaw high (chew high, be snooty), church-hatch (church-gate), clipsing (and colling), coffee (a kind of toast and water), colours (blushes), comb-washing (last drainings of honeycomb), corpel (‘corporal’), (an eighty) cow dairy, creeping-up (‘growing-up’), cribbed (and confined) (but see Barnes's crib), curst (‘afflicted’), dark man (‘the devil’), do the door (‘fasten the door’), doleful-bell (a plant), flame (phlegm), frantical, full-buff (unique spelling, ‘right smack’), furmity booth (though frummety etc. is common), glutchpipe (‘throat’), go azew (cow ‘dry up’), God-forgive-me (mug for warming beer), fret his heart green, griffin (apple), harlican (term of abuse; see CL, iii. 24), het across (‘strike across country’), holm-berry (also OED), house-ridding (‘moving house’, also OED), hurdle-staves (stakes supporting a hurdle), hurdler (‘one who makes hurdles’, also listed but not labelled in the OED), jerry-go-nimble (see slang words), jigging party (OED only), limberish (‘weak’), livier (see ‘local’ words), low upon ground (‘down in the world’), top lip (see ‘colloquial’ words), swing the mallet (‘strike while the iron is hot’), man-a-lost (cry for help), market-nitch (amount of ale for after market), maul down (‘lift down’, OED only), wed over the moor (‘marry at a distance’), near-foot-afore (left fore-foot), nibleykin (of rum) (‘a wee drop’), Od name it all, Od plague you, Odd nation (exclam.), in full pail (said of cows, also OED but not labelled), pick-thong (‘apple’, also OED), pinking in (of day) (also OED), playward (‘playful’, also OED), plumness (solidity), poignard (‘thatching-rod’, also OED), pull-tails (from straw, OED only), rat-tailed (‘and old’) (i.e. a horse), reed-drawer (also OED but not labelled), reed-press (also OED but not labelled), rendlewood (‘ripped-off bark’, also OED), ricking-rod (‘thatching-rod’, also OED but not labelled), rozum (person with strange ideas), scrounch it all!, sharpsand (clean sand), skitty boot (also OED, unique Dorset citation), slim-faced (‘sly’, also OED)*, slittering (‘skipping about’, unique form), spar-house (for spar-making, OED only), spit-and-daub (rough mortar), on the stoop (in a stooping position), strangle (‘strange’), stray-line (see ‘technical’ words), swede-lifting (also OED), take up (the water-meadows) (i.e. clean out the ditches), tardle (sb., ‘tangled mass’, OED only, Wright lists a verb form), tear-brass (‘rowdy’, also OED but not labelled), D’ye tell o't!, teuny (‘sickly’, (p.386) listed by Hardy in his copy of Barnes's 1863 Glossary), thirtingill (‘wrong-headed’, a word Hardy had listed in Barnes's ‘Glossary’), tisty-tosty (‘round like a cowslip-ball’, also OED), toil (‘lay a trap’, also OED), toppermost (adj.), trading o't (going from one place to another), trangley (‘trinkets’), trencher-woman (‘one with good appetite’, also OED but not labelled), unrind (‘fig.’, ‘undress’, also OED but not labelled), what a man (can it be)? (i.e. ‘who?’), wing-bonnet (also OED), with-wind (in attrib. sense, ‘with-wind nature’, OED only), wooden story (‘lame excuse’), wring-down (sb., last drop of cider, also OED but not labelled), wuzz (in this spelling, ‘bronchial wheeze’).

For the following dialect words, Hardy has the distinction of being listed as the first printed example: apple-blooth (‘apple-blossom’), arm-in-crook, a-scram (‘withered’), helate (as vb. ‘to make late’, ‘it belated me’), boy-chap, by-long and by-late (‘in the long run’), catching-pen (also OED but not labelled), cider-wine, clitch (‘fork of a leg or arm’), cow-barton (‘cow-yard’, also OED but not labelled), (slave and) drave (vb., ‘toil’), drawlatching (‘swindling’, listed by Hardy in his copy of Barnes's 1863 Glossary), feat (deed), fetch up (‘fetch round’, revive), flewed (‘flew’), hack (‘uproot turnips’), hay-bonds (OED only), hay-trusser, home-along (‘homewards’, also OED Supplement)*, called home (‘have banns of marriage published’, also OED), honeycomb-work (design, also OED but not labelled), hoosh (exclam., also OED but not labelled), junivals (‘juveniles’), larry (‘confusion’, also OED, listed by Hardy in his copy of Barnes's 1863 Glossary), leg-wood (large branches, also OED), to come mumbudgeting (‘secretly’, also OED)*, newsbell (ringing in ears, portending bad news, also OED), pinning-end (‘pinnacle’, OED only), reed-drawing (also OED but not labelled), rick-stick (also OED), rime (‘sea-spray’), snapper (‘snapper of a storm’, also OED), sniche (‘stingy’), souls (vocative, also OED), streaked-jack (apple), summer's-farewell (daisy), trumpery (‘silly’), twanking (‘whiny’, but also in Halliwell), unhandy (‘incapable’), wriggle (see ‘local’ words), wropper (first in this spelling, ‘an overall’, also OED).

The dialect words for which Hardy is listed as the first modern and last example are: blast (1578, ‘swollen’ as of sheep, also OED), hit in (1713, OED only, ‘go off), jack-o’-lent (see ‘archaic’ words), millers-soul (1585, ‘miller's moth’, also OED but not labelled), shail (sb. 1530), spet (1658, also OED), thoroughsped (1730, ‘dial, rare’, OED only), trant (1597–8, OED only), while (1712, intr. vb., OED only), wringing down (1633, ‘forcing the cheese through the press’, a specifically cider-making term according to Wright, but for the OED a more general term meaning ‘squeeze or press through’, also OED but not labelled). Hardy is the first modern but not last example of: knock-in (the victuals) (1669, also OED but not labelled), smite (1560, intr. vb., as in blacksmithing, also OED but not labelled).