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Reading Gothic FictionA Bakhtinian Approach$
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Jacqueline Howard

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780198119920

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198119920.001.0001

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Gothic Parody: Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey and Eaton Stannard Barrett’s The Heroine

Gothic Parody: Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey and Eaton Stannard Barrett’s The Heroine

Chapter:
(p.145) 4 Gothic Parody: Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey and Eaton Stannard Barrett’s The Heroine
Source:
Reading Gothic Fiction
Author(s):

Jacqueline Howard

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198119920.003.0005

This chapter discusses the difference between Bakhtin's concepts of parody and stylization and indicates the relationship of parodic to other forms of dialogic utterance. It then situates and reads Eaton Stannard Barrett's burlesque, The Heroine, and Jane Austen's posthumously published Northanger Abbey as responses to Udolpho and other Gothic fiction of the 1790s. While there is little doubt for modern readers that Barrett's parodic satire of both novels and female readers tends towards monologism in its desire to suppress alternative ways of speaking and reproduce official norms, Austen's parody of Gothic conventions is dialogic, pluralizing meanings and transforming official norms. Having argued that both Radcliffe and Austen recontextualize aesthetic and other discourses in ways which question and challenge official, patriarchal codes, the chapter summarizes the discursive tensions which the situational analyses of both Udolpho and Northanger bring to light.

Keywords:   Northanger Abbey, parody, stylization, Udolpho, The Heroine, monologism

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