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Elizabethan FictionsEspionage, Counter-espionage, and the Duplicity of Fiction in Early Elizabethan Prose Narratives$
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R. W. Maslen

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198119913

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198119913.001.0001

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George Pettie, Gender, and the Generation Gap

George Pettie, Gender, and the Generation Gap

Chapter:
(p.158) 4 George Pettie, Gender, and the Generation Gap
Source:
Elizabethan Fictions
Author(s):

R. W. Maslen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198119913.003.0005

George Pettie's narratives, like his prose style, construct themselves from a series of oppositions — rival values, competing obligations, antagonistic authorities — all of which are expressed in terms of two central conflicts: war between the genders, and war between the generations. If the stories Pettie derives from Ovid examine the chameleon changes effected by the private imagination, his stories from Roman history explore what happens when the laws of marriage collide with the laws of the state. Each narrative transforms what its sources present as a political incident into a study of the devastation wrought by the intrusion of politics into the private lives of a married couple.

Keywords:   George Pettie, genders, marriage, state

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