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Writing LabourStone Quarry Workers in Delhi$
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Mohammad Talib

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780198067719

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198067719.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Writing Labour
Author(s):

Mohammad Talib

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198067719.003.0001

This book is an ethnography of stone quarry workers located beyond the urban fringe of south Delhi. Based on fieldwork conducted during the mid-1980s and following on trends continuing into the present, this account of the stone quarry workers' lives and conditions is based on stories about them and the stories they tell. This book hopes to describe the experience of survival of a part of India's working class. In the present narrative, the workers have ordinary points to lose and win everyday, including wages earned and rights violated. This book looks at three facets of the workers' collective existence: stones, symbols, and sociation. The analysis focuses on migrant workers belonging to the three scheduled castes — the Ballais, the Khatiks, and the Jatavs.

Keywords:   India, south Delhi, stone quarry workers, ethnography, migrant workers, wages, working class, sociation, symbols, scheduled castes

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