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A History of the SikhsVolume 1: 1469-1838$
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Khushwant Singh

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780195673081

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195673081.001.0001

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Dreams of Sindh and the Sea

Dreams of Sindh and the Sea

Chapter:
(p.259) 17. Dreams of Sindh and the Sea
Source:
A History of the Sikhs
Author(s):

Khushwant Singh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195673081.003.0017

This chapter discusses the activities of the British in Sindh and the Punjab's desire to extend their empire to the sea. The Punjab experienced a period of military inactivity, which they used to do public works and reorganize the justice administration. Some of the public works that were done included the construction of roads and the building of gardens in Lahore in Amritsar. The next section studies the ‘Holy’ War, which occurred on the north-western frontier. This war eventually led to the fall of Symed Ahmed of Rai Bareli, who had led a jihad against the Sikhs. The chapter then focuses on the Punjab's field of cloth of gold, where the Punjab gathered in Ropar and tried to impress the British with their diamonds and gold. In turn, the British displayed their knowledge of navigation, and soon succeeded in opening the Indus to the British fleet.

Keywords:   British in Sindh, public works, justice administration, Holy War, Symed Ahmed, field of cloth of gold, navigation, knowledge of Indus, British fleet

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