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Gandhi and his Critics$
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B. R. Nanda

Print publication date: 1994

Print ISBN-13: 9780195633634

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195633634.001.0001

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Gandhi and Non-Violence

Gandhi and Non-Violence

Chapter:
(p.115) Chapter 13 Gandhi and Non-Violence
Source:
Gandhi and his Critics
Author(s):

B. R. Nanda

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195633634.003.0013

Some commentators have questioned the sincerity and consistency of Mahatma Gandhi’s belief in non-violence, citing his alleged involvement in the Zulu Rebellion, the Boer War, and World War I. Curiously, the same critics, who accuse Gandhi of ‘bellicosity’, argued that the Quit India movement of 1942 was proof of his purblind pacifism and pro-fascist sympathies in World War II. Gandhi developed satyagraha, his non-violent method of redressing social and political injustice, and applied it on behalf of the hard-pressed Indian minority in South Africa. While Gandhi was personally against violence and war, those who looked up to him for guidance were not. Gandhi knew that Nazism and Fascism represented the apotheosis of violence, but he rejected the notion that Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini were beyond redemption.

Keywords:   Quit India movement, non-violence, pacifism, Nazism, Fascism, satyagraha

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