Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Toward a Generous OrthodoxyProspects for Hans Frei's Postliberal Theology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jason A. Springs

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780195395044

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195395044.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 January 2018

"Christ Called Himself Truth, Not Custom"

"Christ Called Himself Truth, Not Custom"

Chapter:
(p.167) 8 "Christ Called Himself Truth, Not Custom"
Source:
Toward a Generous Orthodoxy
Author(s):

Jason A. Springs (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Discontinued
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195395044.003.0008

Chapter 8 employs insights from the work of pragmatist philosophers Wilfrid Sellars, Robert Brandom, Jeffrey Stout, and speech-act theory to further clarify, enrich, and expand Frei's account of literal reading and the plain sense of scripture. It aims to identify and sort out the several delicately interwoven strands of normative constraint in scriptural practices which easily become tangled in Frei's latest writings. Such tangles obscure the nuances of his claims and invite charges that Frei, for instance, merely offers cultural-linguistic correction of his earlier claims about realistic narrative, and that what inevitably ensues is a textual "warranted assertability" that collapses meaning into the community of readers' uses of the text.

Keywords:   pragmatism, Wilfrid Sellars, Robert Brandom, Jeffrey Stout, speech-act theory

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .